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Below are two postgres queries that are almost identical, but produce to vastly different query plans and execution times. I'm assuming that the first query is quick, because there are only 196 form_instance records where form_id = 'W40', whereas there are 7000 where form_id = 'W30L'. But why does a jump from 200 to 7000 records (which seems relatively minor to me) cause such a staggering increase in query time? I've tried to index the data in various ways to speed this up, but am basically flummoxed. How can I speed this up? (Note that schemas for both tables are included at the bottom).

explain analyze select form_id,form_instance_id,answer,field_id
from form_instances,field_instances 
where workflow_state = 'DRqueued' and form_instance_id = form_instances.id 
and field_id in ('Book_EstimatedDueDate','H_SubmittedDate','H_Ccode','miscarriage','miscarriage_of_multiple','stillbirth','AP_IUFD_of_multiple','maternal_death','birth_includes_transport','newborn_death','H_Pid','H_Mid1','H_Mid2','H_Mid3')
and (form_id = 'W40');

QUERY PLAN                                                                                                                                
 Nested Loop  (cost=0.00..70736.14 rows=4646 width=29) (actual time=0.000..20.000 rows=2399 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using form_id_and_workflow_state on form_instances  (cost=0.00..1041.42 rows=507 width=8) (actual time=0.000..0.000 rows=196 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (((form_id)::text = 'W40'::text) AND ((workflow_state)::text = 'DRqueued'::text))
   ->  Index Scan using index_field_instances_on_form_instance_id on field_instances  (cost=0.00..137.25 rows=17 width=25) (actual time=0.000..0.102 rows=12 loops=196)
         Index Cond: (field_instances.form_instance_id = form_instances.id)
         Filter: ((field_instances.field_id)::text = ANY ('{Book_EstimatedDueDate,H_SubmittedDate,H_Ccode,miscarriage,miscarriage_of_multiple,stillbirth,AP_IUFD_of_multiple,maternal_death,birth_includes_transport,newborn_death,H_Pid,H_Mid1,H_Mid2,H_Mid3}'::text[]))
 Total runtime: 30.000 ms
(7 rows)

explain analyze select form_id,form_instance_id,answer,field_id 
from form_instances,field_instances 
where workflow_state = 'DRqueued' and form_instance_id = form_instances.id 
and field_id in ('Book_EstimatedDueDate','H_SubmittedDate','H_Ccode','miscarriage','miscarriage_of_multiple','stillbirth','AP_IUFD_of_multiple','maternal_death','birth_includes_transport','newborn_death','H_Pid','H_Mid1','H_Mid2','H_Mid3') 
and (form_id = 'W30L');

QUERY PLAN                                                                                                                             
 Hash Join  (cost=34300.46..160865.40 rows=31045 width=29) (actual time=65670.000..74960.000 rows=102777 loops=1)
   Hash Cond: (field_instances.form_instance_id = form_instances.id)
   ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on field_instances  (cost=29232.57..152163.82 rows=531718 width=25) (actual time=64660.000..72800.000 rows=526842 loops=1)
         Recheck Cond: ((field_id)::text = ANY ('{Book_EstimatedDueDate,H_SubmittedDate,H_Ccode,miscarriage,miscarriage_of_multiple,stillbirth,AP_IUFD_of_multiple,maternal_death,birth_includes_transport,newborn_death,H_Pid,H_Mid1,H_Mid2,H_Mid3}'::text[]))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on index_field_instances_on_field_id  (cost=0.00..29099.64 rows=531718 width=0) (actual time=64630.000..64630.000 rows=594515 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((field_id)::text = ANY ('{Book_EstimatedDueDate,H_SubmittedDate,H_Ccode,miscarriage,miscarriage_of_multiple,stillbirth,AP_IUFD_of_multiple,maternal_death,birth_includes_transport,newborn_death,H_Pid,H_Mid1,H_Mid2,H_Mid3}'::text[]))
   ->  Hash  (cost=5025.54..5025.54 rows=3388 width=8) (actual time=980.000..980.000 rows=10457 loops=1)
         ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on form_instances  (cost=90.99..5025.54 rows=3388 width=8) (actual time=10.000..950.000 rows=10457 loops=1)
               Recheck Cond: (((form_id)::text = 'W30L'::text) AND ((workflow_state)::text = 'DRqueued'::text))
               ->  Bitmap Index Scan on form_id_and_workflow_state  (cost=0.00..90.14 rows=3388 width=0) (actual time=0.000..0.000 rows=10457 loops=1)
                     Index Cond: (((form_id)::text = 'W30L'::text) AND ((workflow_state)::text = 'DRqueued'::text))
 Total runtime: 75080.000 ms

# \d form_instances                                        Table "public.form_instances"     Column      |            Type             |                          Modifiers                          
-----------------+-----------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------------
 id              | integer                     | not null default nextval('form_instances_id_seq'::regclass)
 form_id         | character varying(255)      | 
 created_at      | timestamp without time zone | 
 updated_at      | timestamp without time zone | 
 created_by_id   | integer                     | 
 updated_by_id   | integer                     | 
 workflow        | character varying(255)      | 
 workflow_state  | character varying(255)      | 
 validation_data | text                        | 
Indexes:
    "form_instances_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
    "form_id_and_workflow_state" btree (form_id, workflow_state)
    "index_form_instances_on_form_id" btree (form_id)
    "index_form_instances_on_workflow_state" btree (workflow_state)

# \d field_instances
                                        Table "public.field_instances"
      Column      |            Type             |                          Modifiers                           
------------------+-----------------------------+--------------------------------------------------------------
 id               | integer                     | not null default nextval('field_instances_id_seq'::regclass)
 form_instance_id | integer                     | 
 created_at       | timestamp without time zone | 
 updated_at       | timestamp without time zone | 
 created_by_id    | integer                     | 
 updated_by_id    | integer                     | 
 field_id         | character varying(255)      | 
 answer           | text                        | 
 state            | character varying(255)      | 
 explanation      | text                        | 
 idx              | integer                     | not null default 0
Indexes:
    "field_instances_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
    "field_instances__lower_answer" btree (lower(answer))
    "index_field_instances_on_answer" btree (answer)
    "index_field_instances_on_field_id" btree (field_id)
    "index_field_instances_on_field_id_and_answer" btree (field_id, answer)
    "index_field_instances_on_form_instance_id" btree (form_instance_id)
    "index_field_instances_on_idx" btree (idx)
share|improve this question
5  
Well, certainly the system's estimates of how many rows there might be are off We can see that in the second query it estimated 3388 rows from the bitmap index scan but actually got 10457. You might want to vacuum full analyze; and/or reindex and/or cluster and see how that helps. –  Seth Robertson Jun 22 '11 at 15:08
    
I did a vacuum full analyze which didn't do anything, but the reindex made a huge difference. Thanks. –  zippy Jun 22 '11 at 15:56
    
What version of PG are you on? –  Bob Jun 22 '11 at 16:30
    
PostgreSQL 8.3.8 –  zippy Jun 22 '11 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Previously a comment but since it seems to have solved the problem, I will promote to an actual answer.

The system's estimates of how many rows there might be is off. We can see that in the second query it estimated 3388 rows from the bitmap index scan but actually got 10457.

So you might want to vacuum full analyze;

Additionally other commands which can drastically help include reindex and/or cluster.

OP stated that the vacuum did not help, but reindex did.

share|improve this answer
    
Though it did work. What's weird is that it even choose the same query plan, and is still incorrectly estimating the row values. -> Bitmap Heap Scan on form_instances (cost=92.09..3597.16 rows=3496 width=8) (actual time=60.000..100.000 rows=10462 loops=1) So I don't know why this worked. –  zippy Jun 22 '11 at 16:42
    
"vacuum full" has nothing to do with this problem, and in most cases it actually makes performance worse. See wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/VACUUM_FULL for details. All that's needed to update the statistics is a simple "ANALYZE". –  Greg Smith Jun 25 '11 at 1:36
    
@Greg: Your statement is both true and irrelevant. The wiki page is talking about performance while you are doing the operation, and about update/write performance—it should always strictly increase read-only performance (absent index problems). The statement that indices are not updated is equally true, but if you note I did recommend a reindex and in fact that fixed his problem (irregardless of the vacuum). However, it is always a good reminder that vacuum full should not be used without understanding the implications. That can probably be said with most commands, though. –  Seth Robertson Jun 25 '11 at 20:05

I'm not sure where the numbers in your summary came from, because the second query plan you posted is outputting 102777 rows while the first one is outputting 2399 rows. That's 43X as many rows, so the fact that a very different query plan is being picked isn't surprising. As for why the runtime difference is even larger than that, the optimizer is making a moderate mistake in estimating how sensitive the filters on form_id and workflow_state are. You may want to increase the default_statistics_target value for this database and run ANALYZE again, which is particularly true if you're on PostgreSQL 8.3 where the default is quite low. See Tuning Your PostgreSQL Server for more information about that parameter.

It's quite possible the difference between the two is so large simply because all of the data needed to answer the small query is already sitting in memory, while the larger one involves more disk access to answer. Running each query more than once may shed some light on if runtime improves after the data is read into cache. The REINDEX you did could have shrunk the index down enough that it fit into cache in both cases, thus curing the problem for now. That index may get "bloated" again though.

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