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I'm searching for a way to call a parent class constructor(?) auto-magically from a child class:

(Note: This is just an example, so typing errors may be present)

Class myParent()
{
    protected $html;

    function __construct( $args )
    {
        $this->html = $this->set_html( $args );
    }

    protected function set_html( $args )
    {
        if ( $args['foo'] === 'bar' )
            $args['foo'] = 'foobar';
        return $args;
    }
}

Class myChild extends myParent
{
    public function do_stuff( $args )
    {
        return $this->html;
    }
}

Class myInit
{
    public function __construct( $args )
    {
        $this->get_stuff( $args );
    }

    public function get_stuff( $args )
    {
        $my_child = new myChild();
        print_r( $my_child->do_stuff( $args ) );
    }
}

$args = array( 'foo' => 'bar, 'what' => 'ever' );
new myInit( $args );

// Should Output:
/* Array( 'foo' => 'foobar', 'what' => 'ever' ) */

What I want to avoid is having to call (inside Class myChild) __construct( $args ) { parent::__construct( $args ); }.

Question: Is this possible? If so: How?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Why are you opposed to calling parent::__construct()? –  cspray Jun 22 '11 at 15:13
1  
I'd like PHP to magically write my application too. –  Wesley van Opdorp Jun 22 '11 at 15:14
    
@Wesley van Opdorp Please see the solution. Works for me. @Charles Sprayberry I got a base class that gets extended by an unknown number of child classes and therefore I have to run a standard procedure for all input arguments (like dropping invalid input, parsing defaults, etc.) –  kaiser Jun 22 '11 at 16:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In your sample code, myParent::__construct will already get called wen instanciating myChild. To get your code to work as you want simply change

public function get_stuff( $args )
{
    $my_child = new myChild();
    print_r( $my_child->do_stuff( $args ) );
}

by

 public function get_stuff( $args )
    {
        $my_child = new myChild($args);
        print_r( $my_child->do_stuff() );
    }

As long as myChild has no constructor, the parent constructor will be called / inherited.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. +1. I haven't known that I can drop it into the class and the parent constructor get's called. Thanks –  kaiser Jun 22 '11 at 16:04
1  
glad to help ;) –  malko Jun 22 '11 at 16:05
    
As long as myChild has no constructor, the parent constructor will be called / inherited. Thank you sooo much! I've searched a lot to find this simple statement describing perfectly what's going on! –  Sliq Jun 17 '13 at 20:05

As Child has no constructor present and extends Parent, any time new Child() is specified the Parent constructor will be implicitly called.

If you do specify a Child constructor then you have to use specify parent::__construct(); inside the Child constructor as it will not be called implicitly.

N.B When defining a constructor in a subclass it is best practice to call parent::__construct() on the first line of the method definition so that any instance parameters and state inherited is set prior to subclass initiation.

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