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Recently I've been learning Lua and I love how easy it is to write a function that returns a function. I know it's fairly easy in Perl as well, but I don't think I can do it in C without some heartache. How do you write a function generator in your favorite language?


So that it's easier to compare one language to another, please write a function that generates a quadratic formula:

f(x) = ax^2 + bx + c

Your function should take three values (a, b, and c) and returns f. To test the function, show how to generate the quadratic formula:

f(x) = x^2 - 79x + 1601

Then show how to calculate f(42). I'll post my Lua result as an answer for an example.


Some additional requirements that came up:

  1. All of a, b, c, x, and f(x) should be floating point numbers.

  2. The function generator should be reentrant. That means it should be possible to generate:

    g(x) = x^2 + x + 41
    

    And then use both f(x) and g(x) in the same scope.

Most of the answers already meet those requirements. If you see an answer that doesn't, feel free to either fix it or note the problem in a comment.

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closed as not constructive by Will Jun 17 '13 at 14:12

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1  
+1 just because :) –  leppie Mar 13 '09 at 22:27

54 Answers 54

up vote 19 down vote accepted

C - no globals, no non-standard library

Not pretty, and not very well generalized, but...

typedef struct tagQuadraticFunctor QuadraticFunctor, *PQuadraticFunctor;

typedef double (*ExecQuadratic)(PQuadraticFunctor f, double x);

struct tagQuadraticFunctor{
    double a;
    double b;
    double c;
    ExecQuadratic exec;
};

double ExecQuadraticImpl(PQuadraticFunctor f, double x){
    return f->a * x * x + f->b * x + f->c;
}

QuadraticFunctor Quadratic(double a, double b, double c){
    QuadraticFunctor rtn;
    rtn.a = a;
    rtn.b = b;
    rtn.c = c;
    rtn.exec = &ExecQuadraticImpl;
    return rtn;
}

int main(){
    QuadraticFunctor f = Quadratic(1, -79, 1601);

    double ans = f.exec(&f, 42);

    printf("%g\n", ans);
}


and here's a version that generalizes the functor a little more, and now it's really starting to look like C wannabe C++:


#include <stdarg.h>

typedef struct tagFunctor Functor, *PFunctor;

typedef void (*Exec)(PFunctor f, void *rtn, int count, ...);

struct tagFunctor{
    void *data;
    Exec exec;
};

void ExecQuadratic(PFunctor f, void *rtn, int count, ...){
    if(count != 1)
        return;

    va_list vl;
    va_start(vl, count);
    double x = va_arg(vl, double);
    va_end(vl);

    double *args = (double*)f->data;
    *(double*)rtn = args[0] * x * x + args[1] * x + args[2];
}

Functor Quadratic(double a, double b, double c){
    Functor rtn;
    rtn.data = malloc(sizeof(double) * 3);
    double *args = (double*)rtn.data;
    args[0] = a;
    args[1] = b;
    args[2] = c;
    rtn.exec = &ExecQuadratic;
    return rtn;
}

int main(){
    Functor f = Quadratic(1, -79, 1601);

    double ans;
    f.exec(&f, &ans, 1, 42.0); // note that it's very important
                               // to make sure the last argument
                               // here is of the correct type!

    printf("%g\n", ans);

    free(f.data);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It does illustrate some of the many ways in which C is starting to really show its age. Nevertheless, that beat-up old screwdriver you keep handy on the workbench is sometimes just the right tool for the job, eh? But not THIS job, me thinks. –  P Daddy Mar 16 '09 at 23:57
1  
blegh, this is so not the right way to use C –  Matt Joiner Nov 6 '09 at 16:09

JavaScript

function quadratic(a, b, c) 
{
    return function(x) 
    {
        return a*(x*x) + b*x +c;
    }
}

var f = quadratic(1, -79, 1601);
alert(f(42));
share|improve this answer
2  
Javascript gets a bad rap sometimes, but it's shocking how straightforward this implementation is. –  Beska Mar 13 '09 at 19:41
5  
Javascript as a language is beautiful; it's the cross-browser / speed issues that cause the suckage. –  John McCollum Mar 13 '09 at 22:31
5  
@John - that's kind of five years ago, the speed is almost never a factor now and the cross-browser pain is very easy to abstract away. –  annakata Mar 16 '09 at 21:28

Haskell

quadratic a b c = \x -> a*x*x + b*x + c

or, I think more neatly:

quadratic a b c x = a*x*x + b*x + c

(if you call it with only three parameters, you get back a function ready for the fourth)

To use:

let f = quadratic 1 -79 1601 in f 42

Edit

Generalizing it to arbitrary-order polynomials (as the OCaml answer does) is even nicer in Haskell:

polynomial coeff = sum . zipWith (*) coeff . flip iterate 1 . (*)
f = polynomial [1601, -79, 1]
main = print $ f 42

Perverse

Treating functions as if they were numbers:

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}
instance Eq (a -> a) where (==) = const . const False
instance Show (a -> a) where show = const "->"
instance (Num a) => Num (a -> a) where
    (f + g) x = f x + g x; (f * g) x = f x * g x
    negate f = negate . f; abs f = abs . f; signum f = signum . f
    fromInteger = const . fromInteger
instance (Fractional a) => Fractional (a -> a) where
    (f / g) x = f x / g x
    fromRational = const . fromRational

quadratic a b c = a*x^2 + b*x + c
    where x = id :: (Fractional t) => t -> t
f = quadratic 1 (-79) 1601
main = print $ f 42

...although if 1 (-79) 1601 weren't numeric literals, this would require some additional application of const.

share|improve this answer
2  
This makes me want to learn Haskell... –  Chris Lutz Mar 13 '09 at 19:49

Python

def quadratic(a, b, c):
    return lambda x: a*x**2 + b*x + c

print quadratic(1, -79, 1601)(42) 
# Outputs 47


Without using lambda (functions can be passed around in Python like any variable, class etc):

def quadratic(a, b, c):
    def returned_function(x):
        return a*x**2 + b*x + c
    return returned_function
print quadratic(1, -79, 1601)(42)
# Outputs 47


Equivalent using a class rather than returning a function:

class quadratic:
    def __init__(self, a, b, c):
        self.a, self.b, self.c = a, b, c
    def __call__(self, x):
        return self.a*x**2 + self.b*x + self.c

print quadratic(1, -79, 1601)(42)
# Outputs 47
share|improve this answer
2  
I would say that returning a function here is more Pythonic, since the object returned from quadratic() (in either version) is only meant to be called. The class version is like creating an iterable class when all you need is a generator function—overkill, without any real benefit. –  Miles Mar 16 '09 at 23:28

C# using only Lambdas

Func<double, double, double, Func<double, double>> curry = 
    (a, b, c) => (x) => (a * (x * x) + b * x + c);
Func<double, double> quad = curry(1, -79, 1601);
share|improve this answer

PHP 5.3

function quadratic($a, $b, $c) 
{
    return function($x) use($a, $b, $c)
    {
        return $a*($x*$x) + $b*$x + $c;
    };
}

$f = quadratic(1, -79, 1601);
echo $f(42);
share|improve this answer

C++

I don't see one using boost::lambda yet...

#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/lambda.hpp>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;
using namespace boost::lambda;

function<float(float)> g(float a,float b,float c)
{
  return a*_1*_1 + b*_1 + c;
}

int main(int,char**)
{
  const function<float(float)> f=g(1.0,-79.0,1601.0);

  cout << f(42.0) << endl;

  return 0;
}

(works with whichever gcc and boost are current on Debian/Lenny).

share|improve this answer
2  
boost::lambda challenges me and fills me with a pleasant kind of fear. –  IfLoop Mar 14 '09 at 4:10

Clojure

(defn quadratic [a b c]
  #(+ (* a % %) (* b %) c))

((quadratic 1 -79 1601) 42)    ; => 47

Edit

Arbitrary-order polynomials:

(use 'clojure.contrib.seq-utils 'clojure.contrib.math)
(defn polynomial [& cs]
  #(apply +
          (map (fn [[pow c]] (* c (expt % pow)))
               (indexed cs))))

((polynomial 1601 -79 1) 42)   ; => 47

Featuring parameter list destructuring goodness and some handy libs from clojure.contrib.

share|improve this answer

Scheme

(define (quadratic a b c)
    (lambda (x)
        (+ (* a x x) (* b x) c)) )

(display ((quadratic 1 -79 1601) 42))
share|improve this answer

Java

(untested)

First, we need a Function interface:

public interface Function {
    public double f(double x);
}

And a method somewhere to create our quadratic function. Here we're returning an anonymous implementation of our Function interface. This is how Java does "closures". Yeah, it's ugly. Our parameters need to be final for this to compile (which is good).

public Function quadratic(final double a, final double b, final double c) {
    return new Function() {
        public double f(double x) {
            return a*x*x + b*x + c;
        }
    };
}

From here on out, it's reasonably clean. We get our quadratic function:

Function ourQuadratic = quadratic(1, -79, 1601);

and use it to get our answer:

double answer = ourQuadratic.f(42);
share|improve this answer

Java

You don't.

And here's why:

// OneArgFunction.java
// Generic interface for reusability!
public interface OneArgFunction<P,R> {
    public R evaluate(P param);
}
// Somewhere in your code
public OneArgFunction<Double, Double> quadratic(final double a, final double b, final double c) {
    return new OneArgFunction<Double, Double>() {
        public Double evaluate(Double param) {
            return param*param*a + param*b + c;
        }
    };
}
// And...
OneArgFunction<Double, Double> quadratic = quadratic(1, -79, 1601);
System.out.println(quadratic.evaluate(42));
share|improve this answer
1  
For all the griping about this, it does show the way to something better. Just a little syntactic sugar would allow a lambda-like expression to implement a one-method interface. A bit of type inference and it would be fine. Okay, the names closed over must be final, but Haskell wears that same limitation with pride! –  Daniel Earwicker Jan 29 '10 at 12:32

Ruby

def foo (a,b,c)
  lambda {|x| a*x**2 + b*x + c}
end

bar = foo(1, -79, 1601)

puts bar[42]

gives

47
share|improve this answer
1  
I kind of like bar.call(), actually. It's nice and explicit, and it clearly says "Hey, this isn't a function but we're calling it as one!" At least, as far as I can tell. –  Chris Lutz Mar 13 '09 at 20:18
1  
Methods and variables are in different namespaces. It would be ambiguous whether you wanted to call the method bar or the lambda that's the value of the variable bar. Proc#call is the "real" method for calling a lambda, but since lambdas are objects and Ruby is TIMTOWTDI, the [] method is an alias. –  Chuck Mar 15 '09 at 1:49

F#

Here's a nice one line example in F#:

let quadratic a b c x = a*x*x + b*x + c
let f = quadratic 1 -79 1601 // Use function currying.

printfn "%i" (f 42)

And for arbitrary-order:

let polynomial coeffs x = 
    coeffs |> List.mapi (fun i c -> c * (pown x i)) |> List.sum
let f = polynomial [1601; -79; 1]
f 42

And to generalize over numerics:

let inline polynomial coeffs x =
    coeffs |> List.rev |> List.mapi (fun i c -> c * (pown x i)) |> List.sum

> let f = polynomial [1601.; -79.; 1.];;
val f : (float -> float)

> let g = polynomial [1601m; -79m; 1m];;
val g : (decimal -> decimal)
share|improve this answer

x86_32 Assembly (I am very new to it, it may not be the best way to do it, comments welcome):

#define ENTER_FN \
    pushl %ebp; \
    movl %esp, %ebp
#define EXIT_FN \
    movl %ebp, %esp; \
    popl %ebp; \
    ret
.global main

calculate_fabcx: #c b a x
    ENTER_FN


    # %eax= a*x*x
    movl 20(%ebp), %eax
    imull %eax, %eax
    imull 16(%ebp), %eax


    # %ebx=b*x
    movl 12(%ebp), %ebx
    imull 20(%ebp), %ebx

    # %eax = f(x)
    addl %ebx, %eax
    addl 8(%ebp), %eax

    EXIT_FN

calculate_f: #x
    ENTER_FN

    pushl 8(%ebp) # push x
    movl $0xFFFFFFFF, %eax # replace by a
    pushl %eax
    movl $0xEEEEEEEE, %eax # replace by b
    pushl %eax
    movl $0xDDDDDDDD, %eax # replace by c
    pushl %eax

    movl $calculate_fabcx, %eax
    call *%eax
    popl %ecx
    popl %ecx
    popl %ecx
    popl %ecx

    EXIT_FN
.set calculate_f_len, . - calculate_f


generate_f: #a b c
    ENTER_FN

    #allocate memory
    pushl $calculate_f_len
    call malloc
    popl %ecx

    pushl $calculate_f_len
        pushl $calculate_f
        pushl %eax
        call copy_bytes
        popl %eax
        popl %ecx
        popl %ecx

    movl %eax, %ecx

    addl $7, %ecx
    movl 8(%ebp), %edx
    movl %edx, (%ecx)

    addl $6, %ecx
    movl 12(%ebp), %edx
    movl %edx, (%ecx)

    addl $6, %ecx
    movl 16(%ebp), %edx
    movl %edx, (%ecx)

    EXIT_FN


format: 
    .ascii "%d\n\0"

main:
    ENTER_FN

    pushl $1601
    pushl $-79
    pushl $1
    call generate_f
    popl %ecx
    popl %ecx
    popl %ecx

    pushl $42
    call *%eax
    popl %ecx

    pushl %eax
    pushl $format
    call printf
    popl %ecx
    popl %ecx

    movl $0, %eax
    EXIT_FN

copy_bytes: #dest source length
    ENTER_FN

        subl $24, %esp

        movl 8(%ebp), %ecx # dest
        movl %ecx, -4(%ebp)

        movl 12(%ebp), %ebx # source
        movl %ebx, -8(%ebp)

        movl 16(%ebp), %eax # length
        movl %eax, -12(%ebp)

        addl %eax, %ecx # last dest-byte
        movl %ecx, -16(%ebp)

        addl %eax, %edx # last source-byte
        movl %ecx, -20(%ebp)

        movl -4(%ebp), %eax
        movl -8(%ebp), %ebx
        movl -16(%ebp), %ecx

        copy_bytes_2:
        movb (%ebx), %dl
        movb %dl, (%eax)
        incl %eax
        incl %ebx
        cmp %eax, %ecx
        jne copy_bytes_2

    EXIT_FN

By coincidence, this thread fits perfectly to whan I am doing at the moment, namely, collecting implementations of Church Numerals in several languages (which is a similar problem, but slightly more complicated). I have already posted some (javascript, java, c++, haskell, etc.) on my Blog, for example here and in older posts, just if somebody is interested in this (or has an additional implementation for me ^^).

share|improve this answer
2  
Trouble if the heap is execute-protected (i.e. W^X or similar technologies) -- you really should mmap a new page and mprotect to make it executable. Otherwise, it's written just fine -- clear and easy to read. –  ephemient Mar 16 '09 at 15:37
3  
Currying in assembly? Sweet. –  ojrac Mar 17 '09 at 21:24

Common Lisp

(defun make-quad (a b c)
    #'(lambda (x) (+ (* a x x) (* b x) c)))

(funcall (make-quad 1 -78 1601) 42)
share|improve this answer

Lua

function quadratic (a, b, c)
   return function (x)
             return a*(x*x) + b*x + c
          end
end

local f = quadratic (1, -79, 1601)

print (f(42))

The result:

47

Several other answers have further generalized the problem to cover all polynomials. Lua handles this case as well:

function polynomial (...)
   local constants = {...}

   return function (x)
             local result = 0
             for i,v in ipairs(constants) do
                result = result + v*math.pow(x, #constants-i)
             end
             return result
          end
end
share|improve this answer

C++

#include <iostream>

class Quadratic
{
	int a_,b_,c_;
public:
	Quadratic(int a, int b, int c)
	{
		a_ = a;
		b_ = b;
		c_ = c;
	}
	int operator()(int x)
	{
		return a_*x*x + b_*x + c_;
	}
}

int main()
{
	Quadratic f(1,-79,1601);
	std::cout << f(42);
	return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Isn't this passing around an object, rather than a function? If that's all that is required, the implementation in most any OO language is trivial. –  T.E.D. Mar 13 '09 at 20:07
1  
@Jon: It's a very common technique, and used a lot in the standard library. An object that overloads operator() is called a functor. Very useful if you want to use some custom comparer while sorting with std::sort, for example –  jalf Mar 13 '09 at 20:43

C++0x

I don't actually have a compiler that supports this, so it could be (probably is) wrong.

auto quadratic = [](double a, double b, double c) {
    return [=] (double x) { return a*x*x + b*x + c; };
};

auto f = quadratic(1, -79, 1601);
std::cout << f(42) << std::endl;
share|improve this answer

perl

sub quadratic {
    my ($a, $b, $c) = @_;
    return sub {
    	my ($x) = @_;
    	return $a*($x*$x) + $b*$x + $c;
    }
}

my $f = quadratic (1, -79, 1601);

print $f->(42);
share|improve this answer

PHP

function quadratic($a, $b, $c) {
    return create_function('$x',
        'return ' . $a . ' * ($x * $x) + ' . $b . ' * $x + ' . $c . ';'
    );
}

$f = quadratic(1, -79, 1601);
echo $f(42) . "\n";

The result:

47

share|improve this answer
1  
I interpreted your answer to mean that you chose to answer the question in PHP. ;-) But I do see your top tag is: "php ×37". Must mean you like helping the lost and suffering! –  Jon Ericson Mar 13 '09 at 21:40
1  
Lost and suffering? There is a subset of PHP 5.2+ that is a fantastic language. –  postfuturist Mar 13 '09 at 21:46
2  
The PHP 5.3 answer looked pretty good! I'll try to keep my PHP bashing to a minimum from now on. ;-) –  Jon Ericson Mar 13 '09 at 23:07

Prolog

test :-
    create_quadratic([1, -79, 1601], Quadratic),
    evaluate(Quadratic, 42, Result),
    writeln(Result).

create_quadratic([A, B, C], f(X, A * X**2 + B * X + C)).

evaluate(f(X, Expression), X, Result) :-
    Result is Expression.

Testing:

?- test.
47
true.
share|improve this answer

Python

In Python using only lambdas:

curry = lambda a, b, c: lambda x: a*x**2 + b*x + c
quad = curry(1, -79, 1601)
share|improve this answer

Ocaml

let quadratic a b c = fun x -> a*x*x + b*x + c

but really, thanks to currying, the following is equivalent:

let quadratic a b c x = a*x*x + b*x + c

For compilation reasons, the first is actually better because the compiler wont need to call caml_applyX and caml_curryX. Read more here

How about general polynomials (with floats)?

let polynomial coeff =
    (fun x ->
        snd (List.fold_right 
                (fun co (i,sum) ->
                    ((i+.1.0), sum +. co *. (x ** i))) coeff (0.0,0.0))
     )
share|improve this answer

C#

public Func<double, double> F(double a, double b, double c){
    Func<double, double> ret = x => a * x * x + b * x + c;

    return ret;
}

public void F2(){
    var f1 = F(1, -79, 1601);

    Console.WriteLine(f1(42));
}
share|improve this answer
2  
F could just return the lambda directly, instead of using that intermediate ret variable. –  Daniel Earwicker Mar 13 '09 at 21:57
3  
yeah you right, just accostumed to do this for debugging purposes –  Jhonny D. Cano -Leftware- Mar 13 '09 at 22:05

Scala

def makeQuadratic(a: Int, b: Int, c: Int) = (x: Int) => a * x * x + b * x + c
val f = makeQuadratic(1, -79, 1601)
println(f(42))

Edit: Apparently, the above solution uses integer values instead of floating point values. To comply with the new requirements, makeQuadratic must be changed to:

def makeQuadratic(a: Float, b: Float, c: Float) = 
        (x: Float) => a * x * x + b * x + c
share|improve this answer

C

With the FFCALL library installed,

#include <trampoline.h>

static struct quadratic_saved_args {
    double a;
    double b;
    double c;
} *quadratic_saved_args;

static double quadratic_helper(double x) {
    double a, b, c;
    a = quadratic_saved_args->a;
    b = quadratic_saved_args->b;
    c = quadratic_saved_args->c;
    return a*x*x + b*x + c;
}

double (*quadratic(double a, double b, double c))(double) {
    struct quadratic_saved_args *args;
    args = malloc(sizeof(*args));
    args->a = a;
    args->b = b;
    args->c = c;
    return alloc_trampoline(quadratic_helper, &quadratic_saved_args, args);
}

int main() {
    double (*f)(double);
    f = quadratic(1, -79, 1601);
    printf("%g\n", f(42));
    free(trampoline_data(f));
    free_trampoline(f);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Smalltalk

A simple solution using a code block:

| quadratic f |
quadratic := [:a :b :c | [:x | (a * x squared) + (b * x) + c]].

And to generate the function and call it:

f := quadratic value: 1 value: -79 value: 1601.
f value: 42.
share|improve this answer

Perl 6

sub quadratic($a, $b, $c) { -> $x { $a*$x*$x + $b*$x + $c } }
my &f := quadratic(1, -79, 1601);
say f(42);
share|improve this answer

C (sorta)

clang (LLVM's C compiler) has support for what they call blocks (closures in C):

double (^quadratic(double a, double b, double c))(double) {
    return _Block_copy(^double(double x) {return a*x*x + b*x + c;});
}

int main() {
    double (^f)(double);
    f = quadratic(1, -79, 1601);
    printf("%g\n", (^f)(42));
    _Block_release(f);
    return 0;
}

At least, that's how it should work. I haven't tried it out myself.

share|improve this answer

JavaScript

function quadratic(a,b,c) {
    return function(x) {
        return a*(x*x) + b*x + c;
    }
}

var f = quadratic (1, -79, 1601);

f(42);
share|improve this answer

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