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Assume I have the following situation:

There is a repository main of User Foo. User Bar forks this repository, so both repositories are in sync. Now user Bar implements a feature and creates a local branch called "barbranch". By the time user Bar is finished with implementing a feature, Foo committed and pushed something to the main repository. So basically the situation looks like this:

A---B---C---D    main repository
         \
          E      forked repository (where C=E)
           \
            F    barbranch on forked repository

Now how can stuff be brought back to normal in user Foo's repo?

Naively I would say:

# switch to the local master and merge barbranch into it
git checkout master
git pull
git pull upstream
git push
git merge barbranch
# merge conflicts occur
vi somefile
git commit -a
git rebase origin master
# this conflict occurs again
vi somefile
git commit -a
git status # says I'm on (no branch) ?!
git push
g    it checkout master
# conflict occurs again!
vi somefile
git commit -a
git push
# send merge request to user Foo

Finally this gives me three ugly commits instead of one.

Checking out the git-rebase documentation I found git rebase --onto .... Though I cannot figure out what the exact command would be and would that whole process would look like in the end.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It depends of the tree you want to get.

If you want a tree representing the real work history, you should not use "rebase" but only "merge"

# on bar repo
git fetch upstream
git checkout master
git merge upstream/master (fast-forward)
git merge barbranch
# resolve conflicts (adding resolved files)
git commit
git push upstream master

If you want to "linearize" the work with rebase, here is what you should do:

# on bar repo
git fetch upstream
git checkout master
git merge upstream/master (fast-forward)
git checkout barbranch
git rebase master
# resolve conflicts + commits (each commit will be processed separately: so you may need to do that several times if various commits are in conflict with the upstream)
git checkout master
git merge barbranch **(fast-forward after the rebase)**
git push upstream master
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Thank you, yeah I want the "linearized" version. Just to clarify: Does it matter on which branch I do git fetch upstream? Each step of "resolve conflicts + commits" is in the end vi somefile ; git commit -a, right? –  user694971 Jun 23 '11 at 12:24
1  
You can fetch from everywhere. Resolve conflicts = ("vi" + "git add resolved_file") for each conflict file + a final "git commit". This way is better when several files are in conflict: you can know everytime which conflicts files are not resolved yet with "git status". –  Benoit Courtine Jun 23 '11 at 20:05
    
This is really weird I'm getting messages like this. Though this branch has been created before the patch in the question has been accepted... –  user694971 Jun 27 '11 at 9:20

I think the following scenario should be ok for your situation.

  • Checkout master
  • Pull the forked branch into your local master
  • Manually fix the conflicts
  • Commit the changes about conflict resolution
  • Push to master

This will actually result in 3 commits into your master (you will have the commits E & F and your conflict resolution commit).

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