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Date date = new Date(0L);

Shouldn't it give me a zero date? Like 00/00/0000? Gives me Wed Dec 31 19:00:00 EST 1969

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5  
The date 00/00/0000 does not exist (the entire year '0' never existed). If software pretends it exists that's a bug. –  beetstra Jun 22 '11 at 16:37
1  
It all started with the Big Bang.. –  Alexander Sabot Jun 22 '11 at 16:38
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That's just a theory (hi Kaley!). And that would have been around 1/1/13,700,000,000 BC (I might be a few days off) –  beetstra Jun 22 '11 at 16:49
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There was no 0 day, 0 month or 0 year. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 22 '11 at 16:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Per the javadocs, this constructor on Date uses an offset from baseline time:

Allocates a Date object and initializes it to represent the specified number of milliseconds since the standard base time known as "the epoch", namely January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT.

Presumably you are on EST, hence the result.

As an aside, I would not expect the result you noted to be produced by any conceivable Date manipulation, since that's not even a valid date (month and day = 0).

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+1 for mentioning the timezone. –  Vineet Reynolds Jun 22 '11 at 16:37

From the Java API:

Date(long date): Allocates a Date object and initializes it to represent the specified number of milliseconds since the standard base time known as "the epoch", namely January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT.

See: http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Date.html

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The time is milliseconds since the epoch.

The epoch is 1/1/1970 GMT.

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Because that constructor creates the object initializes it to represent the specified number of milliseconds since the standard base time known as "the epoch", namely January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT.

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Java dates, and most computer implementation of dates, are stored as milliseconds of seconds starting from what's called the epoch. That is 1 January, 1970. Java date is represented as milliseconds since epoch. and 0 milliseconds since epoch is the epoch itself. And that's why you get that value.

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