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Based on the following definition found here

Returns an iterator pointing to the first element in the sorted range [first,last) which does not compare less than value. The comparison is done using either operator< for the first version, or comp for the second.

What would be the C equivalent implementation of lower_bound(). I understand that it would be a modification of binary search, but can't seem to quite pinpoint to exact implementation.

int lower_bound(int a[], int lowIndex, int upperIndex, int e);

Sample Case:

int a[]= {2,2, 2, 7 };

lower_bound(a, 0, 1,2) would return 0 --> upperIndex is one beyond the last inclusive index as is the case with C++ signature.

lower_bound(a, 0, 2,1) would return 0.

lower_bound(a, 0, 3,6) would return 3;
lower_bound(a, 0, 4,6) would return 3; 

My attempted code is given below:

int low_bound(int low, int high, int e)
{
    if ( low < 0) return 0;
    if (low>=high )
    {
      if ( e <= a[low] ) return low;
      return low+1;
    }
    int mid=(low+high)/2;
    if ( e> a[mid])
        return low_bound(mid+1,high,e);
    return low_bound(low,mid,e);

}
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1  
The exact implementation is not specified by the C++ standard. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 16:56
1  
@Space_C0wb0y: It probably is a show-me-teh-codez question. :-) – Chris Jester-Young Jun 22 '11 at 16:56
1  
@Space: It's "make a C version of C++'s std::lower_bound for me kthx" – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 16:56
1  
@Tomalak: still, since the function requires a sorted range and the standard requires logarithmic complexity I don't think there are algorithms other than binary search that could be sensibly used. :) – Matteo Italia Jun 22 '11 at 16:58
2  
@Gunner: Posting the code does two things. First, it gives us a basis to recommend changes. Second, it shows that you're making an effort and that this isn't a "gimme teh codez" post, and it's much more pleasant to work with somebody than for somebody when not getting paid. – David Thornley Jun 22 '11 at 17:34
up vote 7 down vote accepted

lower_bound is almost like doing a usual binary search, except:

  1. If the element isn't found, you return your current place in the search, rather than returning some null value.
  2. If the element is found, you search leftward until you find a non-matching element. Then you return a pointer/iterator to the first matching element.

Yes, it's really that simple. :-)

share|improve this answer
6  
Although beware that upper_bound is also exactly like doing a "usual" binary search, except that if the element isn't found, you return your current place in the search. There's still a subtle difference :-). Also in both cases if the element is found you can't just stop, you have to keep checking. Basically lower_bound is a binary search looking for the specified "gap", the one with a lesser element on the left and a not-lesser element on the right. Then you return an iterator to the element on the right of that gap. Regular binary search is looking for an element, not a "gap", – Steve Jessop Jun 22 '11 at 16:58
1  
@Gunner: See Steve's comment. I'll amend my post to make that clarification. – Chris Jester-Young Jun 22 '11 at 17:03
1  
@Steve Jessop: a rule that helps remembering where lower_bound and upper_bound point after search is that equal_range returns lower_bound..upper_bound range and it does exactly what it is called. – Gene Bushuyev Jun 22 '11 at 17:05
1  
Note that the search leftward has to be a binary search, not a linear search. Otherwise you can violate a performance constraint. – David Thornley Jun 22 '11 at 17:13
2  
And in practice you don't implement it that way, "first find a match, then find the non-match". You do what the code on cplusplus.com does, which is to search for the discontinuity you're looking for, between lesser elements and not-lesser elements. Then in upper_bound you search for the discontinuity between not-greater elements and greater elements. A "usual" binary search can be written more than one way - one of them ends up at the lower bound if the element is missing, another ends up at the upper bound. It depends which side of the comparison you put the sought-for element, I think. – Steve Jessop Jun 22 '11 at 17:17

The lower_bound and upper_bound functions in python would be implemented as follows:

def binLowerBound(a, lo, hi, x):
  if (lo > hi):
    return hi
  mid = (lo + hi) / 2;
  if (a[mid] == x):
    return binLowerBound(a, lo, mid-1, x)
  elif (a[mid] > x):
    return binLowerBound(a, lo, mid-1, x)
  else:
    return binLowerBound(a, mid+1, hi, x)

def binHigherBound(a, lo, hi, x):
  if (lo > hi):
    return lo
  mid = (lo + hi) / 2;
  if (a[mid] == x):
    return binHigherBound(a, mid+1, hi, x)
  elif (a[mid] > x):
    return binHigherBound(a, lo, mid-1, x)
  else:
    return binHigherBound(a, mid+1, hi, x)
share|improve this answer
int lowerBound (int *a, int size, int val) {
   int lo = 0, hi = size - 1;
   while (lo < hi) {
      int mid = lo + (hi - lo)/2;
      if (a[mid] < val)
         lo = mid + 1;
      else
         hi = mid;
   }
   return lo;
}
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