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I'm wondering how garbage collection works when you have a class with reflection used to get some field values. How is the JVM aware that the values references by these fields are accessible and so not eligible for garbage collection at the present moment, when formal language syntax is not used to access them?

A small snippet indicating the issue (although reflection has been over-emphasised here):

/**
 *
 */

import java.lang.reflect.Field;

public class B {
    protected B previous = null, next = null;

    /**
     *
     */
    public B(B from) {
        this.previous = from;
    }

    public void transition(B to) {
        this.next = to;
    }

    public B next() {
        try {
            Field f = getClass().getField("next");
            f.setAccessible(true);
            try {
                return (B)f.get(this);
            } finally {
                f.setAccessible(false);
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException(e);
        }
    }

    public B previous() {
        try {
            Field f = getClass().getField("previous");
            f.setAccessible(true);
            try {
                return (B)f.get(this);
            } finally {
                f.setAccessible(false);
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException(e);
        }
    }
}

Cheers,
Chris

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Interesting question. Was it inspired by some kind of embedded Java application? –  Doc Jun 22 '11 at 17:26
    
Can you please include a code snippet to clarify what you mean by "a class with reflection used to get some field values?" –  Ben Burns Jun 22 '11 at 17:27
    
Actually, I'm working on a test for a networking framework, and some fields are accessed by reflection. Wondering how reflection has an impact on memory usage, perhaps with the JVM retaining objects its unsure about. –  Chris Dennett Jun 22 '11 at 17:28
    
Reflection always adds additional overhead. For instance, if you're performing a method call using reflection, you must first get a reference to a Method object, etc. This means that you're constructing objects and performing several other calls (and usually some conditional logic) just to perform one method call. Generally speaking you'll favor this approach when its flexibility outweighs the performance disadvantage. –  Ben Burns Jun 22 '11 at 17:34
    
Agreed. I'm doing some complex stuff involving states and deference via proxies, though. Almost like a simpler version of injection. –  Chris Dennett Jun 22 '11 at 17:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you are accessing the fields of an instance, then you will still need a reference to that instance. There would be nothing abnormal about GC for that case.

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Thanks, this makes sense :) –  Chris Dennett Jun 24 '11 at 13:47

To access a field of an object you must have a reference to that object. If you access it via reflections or directly it doesn't make any difference to whether you have a strong reference to the object.

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It's a bit of an odd test case: you're using reflection to access "this". By definition, "this" is live when used in an instance method of the declaring class, so won't be GCed.

But more to the point, reflection simply allows you to manipulate fields, etc.. in objects to which you already have references. That's the key - ff you can give Reflect the instance to examine, you clearly still have a reference to the object, thus it stays alive.

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