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How to make a function in c++ to determine if two entered numbers are relatively prime (no common factors)? For example "1, 3" would be valid, but "2, 4" wouldn't.

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1  
Is this a homework problem? –  mikerobi Jun 22 '11 at 18:49
4  
The Euclidean Algorithm –  Ismail Badawi Jun 22 '11 at 18:49
2  
see Stein's Algorithm or Binary GCD. And, homework. –  Erik Olson Jun 22 '11 at 18:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Galvanised into action by Jim Clay's incautious comment, here is Euclid's algorithm in six lines of code:

bool RelativelyPrime (int a, int b) { // Assumes a, b > 0
  for ( ; ; ) {
    if (!(a %= b)) return b == 1 ;
    if (!(b %= a)) return a == 1 ;
  }
}

Updated to add: I have been out-obfuscated by this answer from Omnifarious, who programs the gcd function thus:

constexpr unsigned int gcd(unsigned int const a, unsigned int const b)
{
   return (a < b) ? gcd(b, a) : ((a % b == 0) ? b : gcd(b, a % b));
}

So now we have a three-line version of RelativelyPrime:

bool RelativelyPrime (int a, int b) { // Assumes a, b > 0
   return (a<b) ? RelativelyPrime(b,a) : !(a%b) ? (b==1) : RelativelyPrime (b, a%b);
}
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2  
-1 for the horrible code style. –  starblue Jun 23 '11 at 9:31
4  
+1 for the "horrible" code style; I got goosebumps reading it. –  hardmath Jun 23 '11 at 12:54
    
+1 for horrible code style - it honors Euclid. Any simple, clear explanation of how it works is missing the pure genius of the astonishing theorem. –  DaveWalley Aug 14 '14 at 20:31

One of the many algorithms for computing the Greatest Common Denominator.

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As referenced in that Wikipedia article under "Further Reading", Knuth's AOCP v.2 (Seminumerical Algorithms) has good analysis of the efficiency of several approaches. –  hardmath Jun 23 '11 at 13:01

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