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So I have been given a C program, which I am trying to make more portable by translating to Java, which has been going well. However, I have run into a bit of hangup, which I believe lies in this bit of code. It just a function that unpacks a 30 byte frame. I have a feeling I am running into issues with the variable types, trying to figure out the best way to sub Java types for some that don't carry over from C. If anyone sees where the issue may be, I would appreciate it.

Java:

public static byte[] unPackBits(byte[] Src, int bitOffset, byte[] Dst, int bitCount){

    int srcByteOffset, srcBit;
    int dstByteOffset, dstBit;
    char dstMask, srcMask;

    srcByteOffset = bitOffset / 8;
    srcBit = bitOffset % 8;
    srcMask = (char)(0x01<<srcBit);

    dstByteOffset = 0;
    dstBit = 0;
    dstMask = 0x01;

    Dst[dstByteOffset] = '\0';

    for(int b = 0; b < bitCount; b++){
        if((Src[srcByteOffset] & srcMask) != (char)0x00){
            Dst[dstByteOffset] = (byte)(Dst[dstByteOffset]|dstMask);
        }
        else {
            Dst[dstByteOffset] = (byte)(Dst[dstByteOffset] & (~dstMask));
        }

        srcBit++;
        if(srcBit < 8) {
            srcMask = (char)(srcMask<<1);
        }
        else {
            srcByteOffset++;
            srcBit = 0;
            srcMask = 0x01;
        }

        dstBit++;
        if(dstBit < 8) {
            dstMask = (char)(dstMask<<1);
        }
        else {
            dstByteOffset++;
            dstMask = 0x01;
            dstBit = 0;
        }
    }
    return Dst;
}

C:

void TRB::unPackBits(char *Src, int BitOffset, char *Dst, int BitCount) {
   int srcByteOffset, srcBit;
   int dstByteOffset, dstBit;
   char dstMask, srcMask;

   srcByteOffset   = BitOffset / 8;
   srcBit          = BitOffset % 8;
   srcMask = 0x01<<srcBit;

   dstByteOffset = 0;
   dstBit  = 0;
   dstMask = 0x01;
   Dst[dstByteOffset] = '\0';


   for(int b = 0; b < BitCount; b++) {
      if((Src[srcByteOffset] & srcMask) != (char)0x00) {
         Dst[dstByteOffset] = Dst[dstByteOffset] | dstMask;
      }
      else {
         Dst[dstByteOffset] = Dst[dstByteOffset] & (~dstMask);
      }

      srcBit++;
      if(srcBit < 8) {
         srcMask = srcMask<<1;
      }
      else {
         srcByteOffset++;
         srcBit = 0;
         srcMask = 0x01;
      }

      dstBit++;
      if(dstBit < 8) {
         dstMask = dstMask<<1;
      }
      else {
         dstByteOffset++;
         dstMask = 0x01;
         dstBit = 0;
      }
   }

}
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What output do you get for each version? Have you tried printing intermediate variables and comparing? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 22 '11 at 19:23
    
I am sure I am choosing poor prints, but all that wins me is loads of undecipherable data that I can't begin to tell if there are any major differences in it. –  Cat Jun 22 '11 at 19:36
    
A short explanation what this.. thing is actually trying to do would be quite useful - not many people will have the patience to go through the execution in detail and make sure they understand the semantics correctly –  Voo Jun 22 '11 at 19:44
    
Of course. It takes in a byte[], an int with the bit offset, another byte[] (typecast most of the time) and a second int saying how many bits that piece of information is. It then returns the unpacked (shifted or inverted) bits in the second byte[], with whatever length was held in the second int. –  Cat Jun 22 '11 at 19:50
1  
Two things: that looks like C++ (it uses the scope resolution operator :: ), also Java more portable than C? –  ninjalj Jun 22 '11 at 20:16

2 Answers 2

You most likely have stumbled upon a very common problem with endianness. C and java might have diffrent ways of representing an int depending on the architecture of the machine running the c-code.

Typically c-programs should convert multi-byte integers into network byte order to simplify portability work like the one your doing right now.

To get the byte-ordering correct you'll have to shift your bits around using the bit-shift and "and" operators.

Also of interest - the nio package has functionality for easily handle LSB byte-order integers typically produced by legacy c-code.

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weird? the are only 2 types, little and big endian, w/ java being big and x86 is little endian. –  bestsss Jun 22 '11 at 20:18
1  
actually there is a lot of other exotic combination found out there in the wild, see for example this link: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endianness#Middle-endian –  vidstige Jun 22 '11 at 20:33
    
@vidstige, sure you can encode (shuffle) the bytes as you see fit, the point is that java supports only 2: little/big via ByteBuffer.order() –  bestsss Jun 22 '11 at 20:39
    
@bestsss see what you mean. That was a bad phrasing, I've clearified what the nio package provides now. –  vidstige Jun 23 '11 at 6:26
    
I thought that could be part of it. I will check it out and see if that helps. –  Cat Jun 23 '11 at 11:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is that C doesn't have a built in way to easily access data inside a char *. The unPackBits function is just extracting data from a certain location (BitOffset) with a certain length (BitCount) and returning it in the same form. Then that data has to be cast to the appropriate types, be it bool, int, double, etc.

Java, on the other hand has a built in way to handle the same issue. Data that is stored in a byte array can be accessed by using ByteBuffer.wrap(byte[]). ByteBuffer has functions that return int, double, long, short, float, and char, as well as ones to put all of those types and a few other useful functions, like translating the entire structure into an int array. Each of these only need to be told the offset, they hold in memory the BitCount. The only primitive data type it doesn't handle is boolean, so I will still be unpacking with the byte array, not a problem since I know exactly where in the array those values are held.

As for the bit shifting, shift the entire array before wrapping it as a ByteBuffer, as suggested by @vidstige, in the same way the first if else in the for loop does, and everything will be in order.

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