Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to take the Name and ID fields from each object, but the fields are appearing undefined.

function OnHistoricalListBoxLoad(historicalListBox) {
    $.getJSON('GetHistoricalReports', function (data) {
        historicalListBox.trackChanges();
        $.each(data, function () {
            var listBoxItem = new Telerik.Web.UI.RadListBoxItem();
            listBoxItem.set_text(this.Name);
            listBoxItem.set_value(this.ID);
            historicalListBox.get_items().add(listBoxItem);
        });
        historicalListBox.commitChanges();
    });
}

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Get)]
public JsonResult GetHistoricalReports()
{
    List<HistoricalReport> historicalReports = DashboardSessionRepository.Instance.HistoricalReports;

    var viewModel = historicalReports.Select(report => new
    {
        ID = report.ID,
        Name = report.Name
    }).ToArray();

    return Json(viewModel, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}

I know that I am returning the data successfully, and I know that there is valid data. I am new to MVC/JavaScript, though.. I checked case sensitivity to ensure that I wasn't making just an easy mistake, but it does not seem to be the issue. Am I missing something more complex?

Inspecting the HTTP Response JSON tab in Chrome I see:

0: {ID:1, Name:PUE} 1: {ID:2, Name:Weight} 2: {ID:3, Name:Power Actual vs Max} 3: {ID:4, Name:Power Actual}

share|improve this question
    
Inspect the HTTP response... what does it look like? –  Felix Kling Jun 22 '11 at 21:10
    
Have you tried inspecting the object in the Javascript to see what it actually contains? –  Karl Knechtel Jun 22 '11 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No idea, but passing such behemoth domain models to views is very bad practice. This is so kinda domain polluted that it has nothing to do in a view. In a view you work with views models. View models contain only what a view needs. In this case your view needs an ID and a Name. So pass a view model with only those single simple properties to this view:

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Get)]
public JsonResult GetHistoricalReports()
{
    var reports = DashboardSessionRepository.Instance.HistoricalReports;
    var reportsViewModel = reports.Select(x => new
    {
        ID = x.ID,
        Name = x.Name
    }).ToArray();
    return Json(reportsViewModel, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}

Now, not only that you will save bandwidth, but you will get some clean JSON:

[ { ID: 1, Name: 'Foo' }, { ID: 2, Name: 'Bar' }, ... ]

through which you will be able to loop using $.each.


UPDATE:

Now that you have shown your JSON data it seems that there is a Content property which represents the collection. So you need to loop through it:

$.each(data.Content, ...);

and if you follow my advice about the view models your controller action would become like this:

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Get)]
public JsonResult GetHistoricalReports()
{
    var report = DashboardSessionRepository.Instance.HistoricalReports;
    var reportsViewModel = report.Content.Select(x => new
    {
        ID = x.ID,
        Name = x.Name
    }).ToArray();
    return Json(reportsViewModel, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}

and now loop directly through the returned collection:

$.each(data, ...);
share|improve this answer
    
When you say the words "view model" -- do you mean "Construct objects specifically intended to be passed back containing only the data you need" ? –  Sean Anderson Jun 22 '11 at 21:14
1  
@Sean Anderson, I absolutely mean this. In my example I've used an anonymous object as they work particularly well with JSON but if you were passing this to a normal View you would be better of defining a special view model type and then strongly typing your view to this view model. –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 22 '11 at 21:16
    
Thank you for the insight! –  Sean Anderson Jun 22 '11 at 21:19
    
Could you take a peak at what I've edited in? I am still seeing undefined, I apologize. EDIT: I figured it out. Inside of the loop I should be saying "this" instead of "data"!! –  Sean Anderson Jun 22 '11 at 21:27
    
@Sean Anderson, what you need to see is [ { ID: 1, Name: 'Foo' }, { ID: 2, Name: 'Bar' }, ... ]. For this the view model passed to the Json method from your controller action must be an IEnumerable of some object (could be anonymous) containing two properties: ID and Name. –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 22 '11 at 21:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.