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I prefer two ways:

void copyVecFast(const vec<int>& original)
{
  vector<int> newVec;
  newVec.reserve(original.size());
  copy(original.begin(),original.end(),back_inserter(newVec));
}

void copyVecFast(vec<int>& original)
{

  vector<int> newVec;
  newVec.swap(original); 
}

How do you do it?

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Second one has misleading name - as it is not a copy (although it is fast). –  Anonymous Mar 13 '09 at 21:29
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4 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Your second example does not work if you send the argument by reference. Did you mean

void copyVecFast(vec<int> original) // no reference
{

  vector<int> new_;
  new_.swap(original); 
}

That would work, but an easier way is

vector<int> new_(original);
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They aren't the same though, are they? One is a copy, the other is a swap. Hence the function names.

My favourite is:

a = b;

Where a and b are vectors.

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In fact the approach is passing by value, the compiler calls the copy constructor, and then swapping that newly created element. That is why rlbond suggests calling the copy constructor directly to achieve the same effect. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 14 '09 at 0:17
1  
However, you can't call rlbon without a function that passes the original as val. Otherwise, the original one will be empties. The second solution made sure that you will always call by value and hence you will not lose the date in the original vector. (Assuming swap deals with pointers) –  Eyad Ebrahim Mar 31 '13 at 13:57
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This is another valid way to make a copy of a vector, just use its constructor:

std::vector<int> newvector(oldvector);

This is even simpler than using std::copy to walk the entire vector from start to finish to std::back_insert them into the new vector.

That being said, your .swap() one is not a copy, instead it swaps the two vectors. You would modify the original to not contain anything anymore! Which is not a copy.

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you should not use swap to copy vectors, it would change the "original" vector.

pass the original as a parameter to the new instead.

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