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If I issue

console.dir(jQuery.prototype)

I get a beautiful list of the methods and properties that are in the jQuery object. But constructor and init are in red with a little plus sign next to them.

Q: What makes constructor and init different than the other functions?

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They look the same as everything else here on Chromium. –  Matti Virkkunen Jun 22 '11 at 22:18
    
While I don't know anything for sure about this, I am willing to bet it has to do with being able to "override" methods that are attached to the jQuery object. jQuery extension methods can be made like such Object.prototype.thisFunc = function() { //dosomething }; Looking forward to the correct answer tho –  MoarCodePlz Jun 22 '11 at 22:19
    
In which browser does it look different? It's all the same in Chrome. –  Felix Kling Jun 22 '11 at 23:21

3 Answers 3

Firebug checks if a function looks like a Class function (obj.prototype contains atleast 1 property), and shows it as a Class with expandable properties.

http://code.google.com/p/fbug/source/browse/branches/firebug1.8/content/firebug/dom/domPanel.js#531

 if (isClassFunction(val))
    this.addMember(object, "userClass", userClasses, name, val, level, 0, context);

http://code.google.com/p/fbug/source/browse/branches/firebug1.8/content/firebug/dom/domPanel.js#1960

function isClassFunction(fn)
{
    try
    {
        for (var name in fn.prototype)
            return true;
    } catch (exc) {}
    return false;
}

You can test it out by running this in Firebug

function isClassFunction(fn)
{
    try
    {
        for (var name in fn.prototype)
            return true;
    } catch (exc) {}
    return false;
}
test = [jQuery.prototype.init, jQuery.prototype.constructor, jQuery.prototype.each, jQuery.prototype.get];
for(var i = 0; i < test.length; i++) {
    console.log("" + i + ": " + isClassFunction(test[i]));
}

Output

0: true
1: true
2: false
3: false
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I guess it's because constructor and init are not just "pure" functions. This means they have additional properties (e.g. init has its own prototype), and that's why they are expandable. To illustrate this a bit further:

// size is defined as something like this
jQuery.prototype.size = function() {
    // do stuff
};
// init is defined as a function too, but with additional properties
jQuery.prototype.init = function() {
    // do other stuff
};
jQuery.prototype.init.functionIsAnObject = true;

In other words: A function is an Object, this means you can attach any properties you want.

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You can attach properties to anything. jQuery.each.foo = 5; console.log(jQuery.each.foo); –  Dogbert Jun 22 '11 at 22:36
    
@Dogbert: Anything that is an Object. It won't work on primitive data types. Something like ´var x = 3; x.text = "hello world"´ will not work, i.e. x is still 3 and x.text is undefined. Although I thought setting a property on a primitive data type does not throw an error as I expected... –  maenu Jun 22 '11 at 22:56

It shows that these functions have additional properties/methods defined for / set on them.

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