Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm having a hard time trying to 'lock' the depth of nested sortable elements, so that they can only sort 'up and down' among their direct siblings.

I thought I had it with this, but I can still 'pull' child items out of their parent and vice versa.

var $sort = $( '#outside-wrapper' ).sortable({

    axis  : 'y',
    items : '.item',
    start : function( event, ui ) {
        // dynamically set the containment to the item's direct parent once started
        $sort.sortable( 'option', 'containment', ui.item[0].parentNode );
    }

});

Here's an example of the markup requirements;

<div class="item">

    <div class="item"><!-- content --></div>

    <div class="item">

        <div class="item"><!-- content --></div>

        <div class="item">

            <div class="item"><!-- content --></div>    

        </div>

    </div>

</div>

Appreciate any pointers!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, many many thanks to jQuery UI: Only allow sortable within its own parent level, and not above or below.

The final result was;

sort.call( $( '#outside-wrapper' )[0] );

function sort() {
    $( this )
        .sortable( 'destroy' )
        .sortable({ items : '> .item' })
        .find( '> .item' )
        .each( sort );
}

The destroy's in there, since I had to rebind whenever I added to the DOM. Seems a little recursively intensive, but as they say... it works.

UPDATE: IE (7 & 8) projectile vomited. Seemed the drag event was bubbling up, and all the parent nodes went with it, moving exponential distances from one another...

Yeah, nice to look at it. Not my cup of tea though. Fixed with handler: '> .handler' i.e. don't use the sortable object as the handler!

share|improve this answer

I'm going to add an answer, even though it's marked as answered:

There is a easier, less pretty solution. If you call the sortable on the children, they remain a group:

<div class="items">
    <div class="one"> x </div>
    <div class="one"> x </div>
    <div class="one"> 
        <div class="items">
            <div class="one"> x </div>
            <div class="one"> x </div>
            <div class="one"> x </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

In the code above, this will work:

$('div.items, div.items').sortable({/* ... */});

I've found this fiddle with similar code: http://jsfiddle.net/GMUbj/184/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.