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What's wrong with this code:

<?php
if ($_GET['variable'] == "a") {
    $variable = "a";
}
else {
    $variable = "b" 
}
echo $variable;
?>

I get an internal server error.

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closed as too localized by LittleBobbyTables, Jay Gilford, jeremyharris, Femaref, Stony Feb 26 '13 at 15:15

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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
<?php
$variable = 'b';
if (isset($_GET['hop']) && $_GET['hop'] == "a")
{
    $variable = 'a';
}

echo $variable;
?>

For an explanation on what you did wrong look here: http://php.net/manual/en/getting-started.php

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This does something different ($variable cannot get "b" anymore) and NOTICE`s are not ERRORs (NOTICEs doesn't break execution). It's cleaner with isset() (or something like that), but it cannot cause the problem. –  KingCrunch Jun 22 '11 at 23:11
    
+1: Because this is a much better way to initialize variables. –  phant0m Jun 22 '11 at 23:11
    
Indeed, but don't confuse matters by transforming the code structure! –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 22 '11 at 23:11
    
@KingCrunch: You don't want any notices in your code. If you minimize them, those that do surface means you have a possible error in the code. Yes, $variable can get b: if the variable isn't equal to "a"! –  phant0m Jun 22 '11 at 23:13
1  
don't confuse matters by transforming the code structure, This is far from confusing, and im not just providing an answer, im also showing how to code efficiently –  RobertPitt Jun 22 '11 at 23:14
show 8 more comments

You missed a semicolon here: $variable = "b";

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Semicolon is missing in else part $variable.

else {
    $variable = "b"; 
}
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You forgot the trailing ; on the $variable = "b" line.

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Mising a semicolon

$variable = "b";
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Missing a semi-colon does not give an internal server error. Check to see if you have a .htaccess file in the root and if its configured correctly.

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Yes it does, On servers such as Nginx you get an internal server error because the fast-cgi return's an error code, this in Nginx will throw an internal server error by default, you have to configure it properly in order to pass the errors to the output buffer –  RobertPitt Jun 22 '11 at 23:23
    
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Propably the missing ; in line 6

    $variable = "b";

Because some other answer provide alternatives too

echo isset($_GET['hop']) && ($_GET['hop'] == "a")
     ? 'a'
     : 'b';

:)

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