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I'm doing some parsing that requires one token of lookahead. What I'd like is a fast function (or class?) that would take an iterator and turn it into a list of tuples in the form (token, lookahead), such that:

>>> a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
>>> list(lookahead(a))
[('a', 'b'), ('b', 'c'), ('c', 'd'), ('d', None)]

basically, this would be handy for looking ahead in iterators like this:

for (token, lookahead_1) in lookahead(a):
  pass

Though, I'm not sure if there's a name for this technique or function in itertools that already will do this. Any ideas?

Thanks!

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possible duplicate of Using lookahead with generators –  Nick Johnson Jun 23 '11 at 1:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There are easier ways if you are just using lists - see Sven's answer. Here is one way to do it for general iterators

>>> from itertools import tee, izip_longest
>>> a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
>>> it1, it2 = tee(iter(a))
>>> next(it2)  # discard this first value
'a'
>>> [(x,y) for x,y in izip_longest(it1, it2)]
    # or just list(izip_longest(it1, it2))
[('a', 'b'), ('b', 'c'), ('c', 'd'), ('d', None)]

Here's how to use it in a for loop like in your question.

>>> it1,it2 = tee(iter(a))
>>> next(it2)
'a'
>>> for (token, lookahead_1) in izip_longest(it1,it2):
...     print token, lookahead_1
... 
a b
b c
c d
d None

Finally, here's the function you are looking for

>>> def lookahead(it):
...     it1, it2 = tee(iter(it))
...     next(it2)
...     return izip_longest(it1, it2)
... 
>>> for (token, lookahead_1) in lookahead(a):
...     print token, lookahead_1
... 
a b
b c
c d
d None
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I would be wary of using this unless SEQUENCE_END = object() and izip_longest(..., fillvalue=SEQUENCE_END), since the sequence itself may contain None (the default fillvalue). –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '11 at 4:05
1  
@ninjagecko, The OP uses None in the question, which is happily the default fillvalue. I'm not sure I understand your point - the for loop is terminated when the iterator runs out, there is no problems having other Nones in the sequence. The only time you need a distinct value there is if you need to special case the final iteration for some reason –  gnibbler Jun 23 '11 at 4:23
    
@gnibbler: Consider the use-case where you want to use lookahead to determine if a sequence contains a double-repeated value, e.g. write a function doesSequenceContainDoubleValue(sequence). If one used this implementation without a special SEQUENCE_END object, it would be an extremely tragic coding error if one merely said any(x==nextX for x,nextX in lookahead(...)), as one ought to be able to do. –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '11 at 4:41
1  
@ninjagecko: sure, that is a case where it would be (hopefully obviously) necessary to have a distinct fillvalue, but again it is still only a problem in the case that the final value of the sequence is also None. –  gnibbler Jun 23 '11 at 5:19
1  
@gnibbler: A minor simplification is to use tee(it) instead of tee(iter(it)) -- these are equivalent for all iterables it. –  Sven Marnach Jun 23 '11 at 11:04

I like both Sven's and gnibbler's answers, but for some reason, it pleases me to roll my own generator.

def lookahead(iterable, null_item=None):
    iterator = iter(iterable) # in case a list is passed
    prev = iterator.next()
    for item in iterator:
        yield prev, item
        prev = item
    yield prev, null_item

Tested:

>>> for i in lookahead(x for x in []):
...     print i
... 
>>> for i in lookahead(x for x in [0]):
...     print i
... 
(0, None)
>>> for i in lookahead(x for x in [0, 1, 2]):
...     print i
... 
(0, 1)
(1, 2)
(2, None)

Edit: Karl and ninjagecko raise an excellent point -- the sequence passed in may contain None, and so using None as the final lookahead value may lead to ambiguity. But there's no obvious alternative; a module-level constant is possibly the best approach in many cases, but may be overkill for a one-off function like this -- not to mention the fact that bool(object()) == True, which could lead to unexpected behavior. Instead, I've added a null_item parameter with a default of None -- that way users can pass in whatever makes sense for their needs, be it a simple object() sentinel, a constant of their own creation, or even a class instance with special behavior. Since most of the time None is the obvious and even possibly the expected behavior, I've left None as the default.

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I would just yield prev, the last time. That way you can tell you're at the end because there's only one item. Your iterable might contain None in the sequence, after all. Or at least, use a special object that indicates the end of the sequence. –  Karl Knechtel Jun 23 '11 at 3:52
1  
@Karl, interesting point -- but wouldn't yield prev, cause unpacking to break? A special object could work though... –  senderle Jun 23 '11 at 3:57
    
It would indeed, so that's definitely a point for adding something. –  Karl Knechtel Jun 23 '11 at 3:58
    
+1 I went ahead and wrote an answer, and realized my code was 100% identical. Well almost 100%... I would do SEQUENCE_END = object() and return that at the end instead of None; this is very important in case the sequence may contain None. EDIT: @Karl: darn, everyone is spot-on correct tonight –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '11 at 4:00
    
@Karl, @ninjagecko, good points -- I decided to add a null_item parameter rather than hard-code it though. –  senderle Jun 23 '11 at 14:33

The usual way to do this for a list a is

from itertools import izip_longest
for token, lookahead in izip_longest(a, a[1:]):
    pass

For the last token, you will get None as look-ahead token.

If you want to avoid the copy of the list introduced by a[1:], you can use islice(a, 1, None) instead. For a slight modification working for arbitrary iterables, see the answer by gnibbler. For a simple, easy to grasp generator function also working for arbitrary iterables, see the answer by senderle.

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2  
The OP asks about doing this on an iterator, but this assumes a list. –  Nick Johnson Jun 23 '11 at 1:08
    
I also would be wary of using this unless SEQUENCE_END = object() and izip_longest(..., fillvalue=SEQUENCE_END), since the sequence itself may contain None (the default fillvalue). –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '11 at 4:04
1  
@Nick one could modify this to work on not-just-lists by using itertools.tee –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '11 at 4:07
    
@ninjagecko Indeed one could - I'm pointing out that your answer as it stands doesn't address the question as the OP asked it. –  Nick Johnson Jun 24 '11 at 0:48

You might find the answer to your question here: Using lookahead with generators.

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I consider all these answers incorrect, because they will cause unforeseen bugs if your list contains None. Here is my take:

SEQUENCE_END = object()

def lookahead(iterable):
    iter = iter(iterable)
    current = next(iter)
    for ahead in iter:
        yield current,ahead
        current = ahead
    yield current,SEQUENCE_END

Example:

>>> for x,ahead in lookahead(range(3)):
>>>     print(x,ahead)
0, 1
1, 2
2, <object SEQUENCE_END>

Example of how this answer is better:

def containsDoubleElements(seq):
    """
        Returns whether seq contains double elements, e.g. [1,2,2,3]
    """
    return any(val==nextVal for val,nextVal in lookahead(seq))

>>> containsDoubleElements([None])
False  # correct!

def containsDoubleElements_BAD(seq):
    """
        Returns whether seq contains double elements, e.g. [1,2,2,3]
    """
    return any(val==nextVal for val,nextVal in lookahead_OTHERANSWERS(seq))

>>> containsDoubleElements([None])
True  # incorrect!
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This answer is clearly wrong because the example given in the question is padded with None. I can see your point but you are answering the wrong question –  gnibbler Jun 23 '11 at 6:29

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