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I am developing a Python module with several source files, each with its own test class derived from unittest right in the source. Consider the directory structure:

dirFoo\
    test.py
    dirBar\
        __init__.py
        Foo.py
        Bar.py

To test either Foo.py or Bar.py, I would add this at the end of the Foo.py and Bar.py source files:

if __name__ == "__main__":
    unittest.main()

And run Python on either source, i.e.

$ python Foo.py
...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 11 tests in 2.314s

OK

Ideally, I would have "test.py" automagically search dirBar for any unittest derived classes and make one call to "unittest.main()". What's the best way to do this in practice?

I tried using Python to call execfile for every *.py file in dirBar, which runs once for the first .py file found & exits the calling test.py, plus then I have to duplicate my code by adding unittest.main() in every source file--which violates DRY principles.

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Why doesn't dirBar have an init.py -- is it not a Python package? –  cdleary Mar 15 '09 at 0:14
    
Good catch; I was just being absent minded--I've added init.py to my example. –  Pete Mar 16 '09 at 19:58

5 Answers 5

As of Python 2.7, test discovery is automated in the unittest package. From the docs:

Unittest supports simple test discovery. In order to be compatible with test discovery, all of the test files must be modules or packages importable from the top-level directory of the project (this means that their filenames must be valid identifiers).

Test discovery is implemented in TestLoader.discover(), but can also be used from the command line. The basic command-line usage is:

cd project_directory
python -m unittest discover

By default it looks for packages named test*.py, but this can be changed so you might use something like

python -m unittest discover --pattern=*.py

In place of your test.py script.

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is pattern the only way to select a restricted set of test to run ? I am having issue with test running fine using discovery but failing when i want to run individual tests due to path issues. –  Frederic Bazin May 23 '12 at 16:22
    
any suggestion for python 2.6 ? –  Larry Cai Jan 8 '13 at 5:37
    
@larrycai either see the other answers here, or check out unittest2 pypi.python.org/pypi/unittest2 –  Peter Gibson Jan 8 '13 at 22:41
    
Thx, unittest2 is a good choice. –  Larry Cai Jan 9 '13 at 2:01

You should try nose. It's a library to help create tests and it integrates with unittest or doctest. All you need to do is run nosetests and it'll find all your unittests for you.

% nosetests # finds all tests in all subdirectories
% nosetests tests/ # find all tests in the tests directory
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up vote 13 down vote accepted

I knew there was an obvious solution:

dirFoo\
    test.py
    dirBar\
        Foo.py
        Bar.py

Contents of dirFoo/test.py

from dirBar import *
import unittest

if __name__ == "__main__":

    unittest.main()

Run the tests:

$ python test.py
...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 11 tests in 2.305s

OK

Sorry for the silly question.

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Either you've missed 'dirBar/__init__.py` or from dirBar import * won't work. btw, use lowercase for package/module names. –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 15 '09 at 4:27
    
Also, the problem with this is that you assume the test cases of Foo.py and Bar.py are exposed in the dirBar init.py module. If they're not, your test.py won't test anything. –  cdleary Mar 15 '09 at 13:38
2  
doesn't work so far, please update it –  Larry Cai Jan 8 '13 at 6:06

Here is my test discovery code that seems to do the job. I wanted to make sure I can extend the tests easily without having to list them in any of the involved files, but also avoid writing all tests in one single Übertest file.

So the structure is

myTests.py
testDir\
    __init__.py
    testA.py
    testB.py

myTest.py look like this:

import unittest

if __name__ == '__main__':
    testsuite = unittest.TestLoader().discover('.')
    unittest.TextTestRunner(verbosity=1).run(testsuite)

I believe this is the simplest solution for writing several test cases in one directory. The solution requires Python 2.7 or Python 3.

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I came up with a snippet that may do what you want. It walks a path that you provide looking for Python packages/modules and accumulates a set of test suites from those modules, which it then executes all at once.

The nice thing about this is that it will work on all packages nested under the directory you specify, and you won't have to manually change the imports as you add new components.

import logging
import os
import unittest

MODULE_EXTENSIONS = set('.py .pyc .pyo'.split())

def unit_test_extractor(tup, path, filenames):
    """Pull ``unittest.TestSuite``s from modules in path
    if the path represents a valid Python package. Accumulate
    results in `tup[1]`.
    """
    package_path, suites = tup
    logging.debug('Path: %s', path)
    logging.debug('Filenames: %s', filenames)
    relpath = os.path.relpath(path, package_path)
    relpath_pieces = relpath.split(os.sep)

    if relpath_pieces[0] == '.': # Base directory.
        relpath_pieces.pop(0) # Otherwise, screws up module name.
    elif not any(os.path.exists(os.path.join(path, '__init__' + ext))
            for ext in MODULE_EXTENSIONS):
        return # Not a package directory and not the base directory, reject.

    logging.info('Base: %s', '.'.join(relpath_pieces))
    for filename in filenames:
        base, ext = os.path.splitext(filename)
        if ext not in MODULE_EXTENSIONS: # Not a Python module.
            continue
        logging.info('Module: %s', base)
        module_name = '.'.join(relpath_pieces + [base])
        logging.info('Importing from %s', module_name)
        module = __import__(module_name)
        module_suites = unittest.defaultTestLoader.loadTestsFromModule(module)
        logging.info('Got suites: %s', module_suites)
        suites += module_suites

def get_test_suites(path):
    """:return: Iterable of suites for the packages/modules
    present under :param:`path`.
    """
    logging.info('Base path: %s', package_path)
    suites = []
    os.path.walk(package_path, unit_test_extractor, (package_path, suites))
    logging.info('Got suites: %s', suites)
    return suites

if __name__ == '__main__':
    logging.basicConfig(level=logging.WARN)
    package_path = os.path.dirname(os.path.abspath(__file__))
    suites = get_test_suites(package_path)
    for suite in suites:
        unittest.TextTestRunner(verbosity=2).run(suite)
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