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The title is pretty self explanatory -- what's the difference between:

raise Exception, "foo"

and

raise Exception("foo")

Does it do exactly the same thing, just different syntax?

I'm using Python 2.x, but I'd like to hear of any differences in Python 3.x

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When you tried it, what did you observe? –  S.Lott Jun 23 '11 at 1:21
    
No discernible difference. –  bradley.ayers Jun 23 '11 at 1:23
6  
I don't assume that because I see no discernible difference, that there is no difference. I think my question is fairly clear, which part are you having trouble understanding? –  bradley.ayers Jun 23 '11 at 1:40
2  
Perhaps the difference between ABC://google.com and abc://google.com both work fine, but the former is incorrect according to ietf.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt (Section 3.1) -- however note that it suggests programs should treat them as equivalent. In this sense for all intents and purposes they seem the same, but there is a difference, one violates the RFC, and the other doesn't. –  bradley.ayers Jun 23 '11 at 10:31
2  
You should be able to see that someone's already answered this question. I have accepted that answer, and so by reading that answer you will be able to see what I considered to be a satisfactory answer. –  bradley.ayers Jun 23 '11 at 11:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 21 down vote accepted

both amount to the same thing in Python2. in Python3, the raise Exception, "foo" syntax is no longer supported.

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2  
See python.org/dev/peps/pep-3109 for more details on that. –  jena Jun 23 '11 at 1:05
    
Thanks, great answer. –  bradley.ayers Jun 23 '11 at 11:13
    
It's also worth mentioning, that raise Exception, ('foo', 'bar') is equivalent to raise Exception('foo', 'bar') –  bradley.ayers Oct 23 '11 at 6:32

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