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If I have 2 tables 1 with a composite primary key where one of the keys is also a foreign key in another table:

Table 1:

  • A (PK, FK - maps to X in Table 2)
  • B (PK)
  • C

Table 2:

  • X (PK)
  • Y

Because A is both the PK in table 1 and FK in table 2, when I use EF to generate the entity model, I have both a Scalar AND a Navigation property for A in table 1. I cannot seem to remove A as a scalar (I think because it is a primary key).

The problem I am having is that if I create a table1Entity and set A's scalar property to a new value, A's navigation property will not be changed automatically (and vice versa).

Ideally I just want A to expose the navigation property - which is the way it behaves if A was not also part of the composite primary key anyway. Is there any way to achieve this?

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3 Answers 3

Am I correct in assuming that Table1 derives from Table2? If so, I would do it like so:

(I'd also change the PK for both tables to the same name, since they probably have the same meaning - for the instance of this, I'll use the example ID)

  • First, create the model with the default relationships (I usually just import the two tables from the database)
  • In the designer, right click the base type, add inheritance, select the derived type.
  • Delete the one to zero or one association
  • Then, since the base type already has column ID, delete it from the derived type.
  • Go to table mapping for the derived type, and map the ID property to the ID of the table.
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Thanks for the reply Mike. Actually there is no inheritance relationship, there are simply a number of tables whos primary key form a composite key on another table. –  Ryan Mar 18 '09 at 23:24
    
Oh. Sorry then! –  Mike Christiansen Mar 21 '09 at 21:39

Well, not really. Create the view with schemabinding and create a clustered index on the view (SQL Server 2008 or later, earlier versions I'm not sure can do that). The clustered index will be recognised as a primary key, thus tricking EF(VS) into believing the view is a real table.

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Instead of mapping to table 1 directly, add a view to your database that's got all of table 1's fields, plus an extra copy of A (A2). Then, map the scalar key to A2 and the nav key to A.

(You'll run into a problem where if you use a view, Visual Studio can't find a primary key; fix this by manually editing the XML of the edmx file and adding a <Key><PropertyRef ... /></Key> to the <EntityType> for table A)

I know - it's hacky and horrible... but hey - it works!

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1  
Well, not really. Create the view with schemabinding and create a clustered index on the view (SQL Server 2008 or later, earlier versions I'm not sure can do that). The clustered index will be recognised as a primary key, thus tricking EF(VS) into believing the view is a real table. –  bert michielsen Jan 26 '12 at 16:18

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