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I want to create a class that reads SMS messages from a GSM device.

I created a timer(system.threading) that reads for incoming message every second.


public void ReadMessage(){
//read sms messages
//and store it into the database
}

Sometimes ReadMessage() takes more than a second. How can I prevent the timer from calling this procedure when the previous one is not yet finished?
1. Are AutoResetEvent and WaitOne good for this?
2. Is Threading.Timer a good choice? or should I do it on a single thread?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should use a System.Timers.Timer, which is easier to work with.
(It's a friendlier wrapper around Threading.Timer)

Set AutoReset to false, then Start() the timer again at the end of the handler.

Don't use a dedicated thread; there's no point in keeping a thread around doing nothing so that you can wake it up every second.

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Is it possible to create multiple instances of my class that uses System.Timers.Timer? What will happen to the elapse event? –  h3n Jun 23 '11 at 2:25
1  
@Fleents: Each timer gets its own event. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 2:26
1  
I don't see what's wrong with a dedicated thread, eg. with a sleep(1000) loop. No explicit timer needed, no possibility of multiple ReadMessage() calls, encapsulated operation, no continual thread creation/termination. It's a three-liner, (including the while(1){ ). –  Martin James Jun 23 '11 at 8:37
1  
@Martin: It wastes a thread. Threading.Timer uses the ThreadPool, so it doesn't waste an extra thread. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 13:12
1  
@SLaks: Well, it uses a thread. On an embedded system where memory economy is vital then, sure, avoiding an extra stack is important. With 2G of virtual memory, I would be more than happy to accept an extra thread where such an approach is the simplest, most encapsulated solution. Maybee it's just me <g> –  Martin James Jun 23 '11 at 13:51

I cannot see any need for an explicit timer trigger at all. If you thread this off:

while(true){
  ReadMessage();
  Thread.Sleep(1000);
};

..does this not do exactly what you want, all nicely encapsulated in one thread?

Rgds, Martin

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Thank you, lnt3! I clicked on 'post' just as I realised I had not formatted the block as code :( Also, yes, 'true' is clearer than '1', as is the Thread namespace, though my post was meant more as pseudo than real code :) –  Martin James Jun 23 '11 at 12:30

Although this question is quite old, you can inspire by this code. It doesn't use any additional thread and it doesn't count time during execution of your code.

/// <summary>
/// Single thread timer class.
/// </summary>
public class SingleThreadTimer: IDisposable
{
    private readonly Timer timer;
    private readonly Action timerAction;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="SingleThreadTimer"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="interval">The interval time.</param>
    /// <param name="timerAction">The timer action to execute.</param>
    /// <exception cref="System.ArgumentNullException">timerAction</exception>
    /// <exception cref="System.ArgumentException">interval</exception>
    public SingleThreadTimer(double interval, Action timerAction)
    {
        if (timerAction == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("timerAction");

        if (interval <= 0)
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Invalid value '{0}' for parameter 'interval'.", interval), "interval");

        this.timerAction = timerAction;

        this.timer = new Timer(interval)
        {
            AutoReset = false
        };

        timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
        timer.Start();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (timer != null)
            timer.Dispose();
    }

    private void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            timerAction();
        }
        finally
        {
            // Enable timer again to continue elapsing event.
            timer.Enabled = true;
        }
    }
}
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