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I'm trying to generate this line in a html file:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

Since I generate the html file using an xsl file and an xml file, I think the code used to generate the line should be included in the xsl file.

I found this solution on Internet ----

<xsl:output method="html" doctype-system="http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd" doctype-public="-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" indent="yes" />

but when I change strict to transitional, things go wrong.

Does anyone have a good solution?

Thank you in advance!

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean when you say "when I change strict to transitional, things go wrong"? Can you add an example of what goes wrong? –  Daniel Haley Jun 23 '11 at 2:44
    
If you go to your doctor and say you don't feel well, he's going to ask for more information about the symptoms. Similarly, if you post on a forum saying "things go wrong", people are going to ask you to explain exactly what happens. –  Michael Kay Jun 23 '11 at 9:10

2 Answers 2

This instruction is absolutely correct from the point of view of compilation:

<xsl:output method="html" 
   doctype-system="http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd" 
   doctype-public="-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" indent="yes"/>

It is not correct from the point of view of the doctype. Because you are going to generate a well-formed XML document based on a specific DTD you should better change your output method to xml:

<xsl:output method="xml" 
 doctype-system="http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd" 
 doctype-public="-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" indent="yes"/>

However there is not reason why the first instruction above should not work. Maybe your XSLT processor takes care of the output method.

share|improve this answer
    
hi, empo. Thank you very much. Today I find this piece of code makes everything right. I am not sure why it is. Anyway, it solves my problem. <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes" doctype-system="w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"; doctype-public="-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" />. –  user811416 Jun 25 '11 at 14:41
    
Oh, the code I post just now is the same as yours. I am quite curious how you get the answer. How did you learn to transform xml to html? Can you please give me some advice, like what books should I read? Thank you very much. –  user811416 Jun 25 '11 at 14:43

Your first and second line are not the same. Your desired output is XHTML but your found solution, the second line, describes HTML. Because you want XHTML (which is basically HTML with a XML Syntax) use this line like @empo (+1) already described:

<xsl:output method="xml" 
 doctype-system="http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd" 
 doctype-public="-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" indent="yes"/>

Some XSLT processors also support xhtml as output method (like e.g. Saxon). But this is not a standard (in XSLT 1.0), use XML instead.

XML->XHTML conversion is no big difference compared to XML->XML.

share|improve this answer
1  
In XSLT 2.0, xhtml is a standard output method. –  mzjn Jul 8 '11 at 21:15
    
@mzjn yes you are right, will edit that. thanks. –  therealmarv Jul 8 '11 at 21:19
    
Thank you both! ^_^ –  user811416 Jul 12 '11 at 7:58

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