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Having some issues with one small function I'm working on for a homework assignment.

I have a static array size of 20 (shelfSize), however, I only need to use a max of 10 elements. So I don't have to worry about out of bounds etc (the entire array of 20 is initialized to 0).

What I am looking to do is insert an integer, booknum, into an element of an array it receives as input.

This my current logic:

void insert_at(int booknum, int element){
for(int i=element+1; i < shelfSize; i++)
    bookshelf[i+1]=bookshelf[i]
bookshelf[element]=booknum;
}

so let's say I have the this array:

[5,4,3,1,7]

I want to insert an 8 at element 1 and have the array turn to:

[5,8,4,3,1,7]

Technically, everything after the final element 7 is a 0, however, I have a separate print function that only prints up to a certain element.

No matter how many times I take some pencil and paper and manually write out my logic, I can't get this to work.

Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should start from the end of the array, this should word for you:

void insert_at(int booknum, int element)
{
    for (int i = shelfsize-1;i>element;i--)
        bookshelf[i] = bookshelf[i-1];
    bookshelf[element] = booknum;
}

Also I recommend that you get used to handling illegal values, for example, what if a user entered 21?

The optimized code would be:

bool insert_at(int booknum, int element)
{
    if (element>=shelfsize-1)
        return false;
    for (int i = shelfsize-2;i>element;i--)
        bookshelf[i] = bookshelf[i-1];
    bookshelf[element] = booknum;
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The odd thing is, after I saw @Simon-Buchan 's comments, I developed the proper for loop. However, I forgot to start it out at "shelfSize-1", yet I did not get an out of bounds error...element 20 of the array shouldn't exist hmmmm. –  Staypuft Jun 23 '11 at 2:45
    
@Staypuft: Welcome :), I just thought It would be like a human telling the computer to insert a book to a shelf, and the human would ask the computer to put the book at the 21st index, The computer then should tell him that it's illegal, you should handle as many errors as you can, I think. –  Tamer Shlash Jun 23 '11 at 2:50
    
@Staypuft: Welcome to C++! The language that never tells you when you're doing something horribly wrong! You were overwriting whatever the compiler put after the end of your array, which can be a security bug. –  Simon Buchan Jun 23 '11 at 3:04

If your example is correct, then you're assuming 1-based indices instead of 0-based. Use the following instead:

void insert_at(int booknum, int element){
for(int i=element; i < shelfSize; i++)
    bookshelf[i]=bookshelf[i-1];
bookshelf[element-1]=booknum;
}

However, I would prefer you just use the same code, and change "at element 2" in your example to "at element 1". Always remember C++ arrays are 0-based.

That being said, please tell your professor that this is why vectors (and other standard containers) were made, and that C++ arrays are evil.

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/containers.html#faq-34.1

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It is actually a 0-based array, I just made a typo. I wish I could use vectors, but professors just love to use non-real world programming restrictions to make your head hurt! –  Staypuft Jun 23 '11 at 2:25
1  
@Staypuft: The idea isn't to teach you how to write programs, it's to teach you how to program, if that distinction makes any sense :). –  Simon Buchan Jun 23 '11 at 2:29

Just noticed, you are copying up, this means your function does this:

 [5,4,3,1,7]
    --^
 [5,4,4,1,7]
      --^
 [5,4,4,4,7]
        --^
 [5,4,4,4,4]
          --^
 [5,4,4,4,4,4]

For moving values in an array, you always want to copy in the opposite direction to which you are moving, so to move up, you want to copy each item up from the top down:

 [5,4,3,1,7]
          --^
 [5,4,3,1,7,7]
        --^
 [5,4,3,1,1,7]
      --^
 [5,4,3,3,1,7]
    --^
 [5,4,4,3,1,7]

And then you can overwrite the index you freed up.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That was never really explained to me concisely in person. You just made so many issues I ran into so much more clear! –  Staypuft Jun 23 '11 at 2:56
    
@Staypuft: Well, it's easier to explain this with diagrams :) –  Simon Buchan Jun 23 '11 at 2:59

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