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How do I convert a Double to Data.Text?

In essence, I had the following code:

Data.Text.pack $ show 9.0

That code has some rather obvious silliness. So I dug around in the documentation and came up with this:

toStrict $ toLazyText $ realFloat 9.0

This seems better, but it seems like there should be a more direct method, but I can't find anything with type Double -> Data.Text. Is this the best way? It seems that if I switch to lazy Text I can avoid this, but I'm not quite ready to do that.

Any words of wisdom?

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What's the problem with pack . show? –  sth Jun 23 '11 at 4:00
    
I was hoping there was a more efficient route from Double to Text. In reality (pack . show) is slightly faster than (toStrict . toLazyText . realFloat) but I'm sure I can get better performance if I keep everything in builders for longer. –  Tim Perry Jun 23 '11 at 18:02
    
I think the title is misleading as it gives the impression that Data.Text is a class. Hence, I changed it for you. You can rollback if you want, but I think this one is more clear. –  alternative Jun 23 '11 at 22:08
    
@monadic: thanks. I didn't notice that. –  Tim Perry Jun 24 '11 at 1:59
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use the printf like package text-format.

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It does seem like there should be a class ShowText a where showT :: a -> Text doesn't it? I'm not a heavy (or even a moderate) user of Text, but Yesod has a class:

class ToMessage a where
    toMessage :: a -> Text

With an instance for String, but what you really want is an instance for Show a, so you'll either need to use undecidable instances or have that as the only instance of an otherwise identical class. It's a shame Haskell doesn't let you close classes...

EDIT: Since my opinion isn't already clear - I don't see any of this as worth while when what you really want is showT = pack . show as a function exported by Data.Text (for convenience). But what you really SHOULD want is nothing at all - Text is (usually) for human consumption and Show instances are rather raw data trees useful mostly to programmers; crossing the two uses strikes me as conflating two interests.

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The tongue-in-cheek answer:

f :: Double -> Data.Text
f = Data.Text.pack . show

Then you simply use

f 9.0

Can't get much more terse than that, right? Don't be afraid to roll your own utility methods for convenience (though they should probably have more descriptive names than f). If you think it could be generally useful, then contact the maintainer.

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Generally I'm not averse to rolling my own methods. I just don't know my way around the Haskell packages very well. For instance, @tibbe answer was what I was looking for, but I didn't remember text-format existed! –  Tim Perry Jun 24 '11 at 2:00
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ClassyPrelude provides a Show typeclass as mentioned in Thomas' previous answer.

See tshow and tlshow. The latter one produces a lazy text.

Note that the default implementation is just T.fromList . Prelude.show.

I recommend reading the Yesod blog on ClassyPrelude for general information about that package. Note that it is not a drop-in replacement for the standard prelude.

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I'll check it out. Thanks. –  Tim Perry Apr 25 at 23:22
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