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I'm not familiar with C++0x. I just started learning C++ myself about 6 months ago, I have a fairly strong grasp though (for a beginner).

I have a templated class:

template <typename T>
class Node
{
   ...
}

Then later, I have this:

template <typename T>
class BinaryTree
{
    protected:
       typedef Node<T>* node_t;
    ...
}

Here, the Binary tree class is serving as a "base class" that can be extended by specializations of binary trees. (AVL Tree, Red-Black, etc.,) The node typedef is protected, because the idea is the specializations will be able to use it...and they can, but it looks pretty awful.

For example, in my BiTree class (my creative name for the most generic binary tree, basically a BST), we have this:

template <typename T>
class BiTree : public BinaryTree<T>
{
   private:
      typedef typename BinaryTree<T>::node_t node_t; // Yuck
   ...
}

To make matters worse, I'm one of those people who likes to specify functions outside of a class, so when I want to say node_t is the return type...well, have a look...

template <typename T>
typename BiTree<T>::node_t
BiTree<T>::insert(BiTree<T>::node_t& node, T data)
{
   ...
}

Is there a way to just use node_t? That was sort of the whole point of inheriting the typedef from the base class. Is this what the using keyword in C++0x is for? How would I apply it to this situation? Thanks.

EDIT: The reason I'm wondering if it's useful is because of this question: C++ template typedef

share|improve this question
    
using is not a new feature in C++0x, so what syntax are you wanting to use? It did get recycled with templated typedefs, but I'm not certain that is applicable here at all [although I don't remember how they're used, so maybe I'm mistaken]. – Dennis Zickefoose Jun 23 '11 at 4:08
    
=( I was wondering if it was applicable because people were talking about template typedefs and using here – LainIwakura Jun 23 '11 at 4:10
    
Well, it can be used as a template typedef (that's the new use in C++0x, actually), but it will not be any different than what you have. It only helps for typedefs where you want to retain one or more template parameter, but not all. – Xeo Jun 23 '11 at 4:16
up vote 8 down vote accepted

The answer to your question is no, it isn't applicable. using in the context you mean is intended for renaming a templated type while retaining its templated nature. You have a specific instance of the template in mind, so it is not appropriate.

However, part of your concern seems to simply be the overabundance of BiTree<T>:: in your function definition. It doesn't seem that bad to me; you get used to seeing constructs like that. But it can be reduced if you want.

What you started with:

template <typename T> 
typename BiTree<T>::node_t BiTree<T>::insert(BiTree<T>::node_t& node, T data) 
{ ... } 

First of all, once you name the function, you're already "inside" the class BiTree<T>, so the compiler will look inside it for types of your arguments.

template <typename T> 
typename BiTree<T>::node_t BiTree<T>::insert(node_t& node, T data) 
{ ... } 

Another new feature of C++0x is the ability to wait to declare the result of a function until after you declare its arguments. It is intended for use in situations where the type of the result depends on the types of the arguments, but it is useful here as well for the same reason as above. The compiler will consider types within BiTree<T> when analyzing it:

template<typename T>
auto BiTree<T>::insert(node_t& node, T data) -> node_t
{ ... }

Almost no repetition. You can technically go one step further:

template<typename T>
auto BiTree<T>::insert(node_t& node, T data) 
     -> std::remove_reference<decltype(node)>::type
{ ... }

Now, you don't even repeat the parameter type, but getting the return type correct is notably more difficult [as evidenced by the fact that I got it wrong initially ;-)].

share|improve this answer
    
I just wanted to edit the trailing return version in my answer when yours popped up. +1 :P – Xeo Jun 23 '11 at 4:29
    
Was just about to post this exactly :) – Simon Buchan Jun 23 '11 at 4:30
    
Exactly what I wanted! Thank you very much. I don't mind a bit of typing, but I had a feeling what I had was a bit too much. – LainIwakura Jun 23 '11 at 4:30
    
"You can technically go one step further", no that's different :) Since node is declared as node_t&, you will return a reference to node_t. nice idea of using trailing return types here. – Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 23 '11 at 9:57
    
@Johannes: Ah, right, good catch. – Dennis Zickefoose Jun 23 '11 at 14:12

Ehm... base class typedefs are available in the derived class without any hocus pocus, just use node_t (though _t is a bad suffix, as all names ending in it are reserved by the POSIX standard). But I'm wondering, why do you make it protected / private if you want to return such a node from insert ? How should that be used, as nobody outside of the class hierarchy can use the node_t?

share|improve this answer
    
Everything in the node class is public, only the typedefs are protected / private. People can access the stuff being returned. You can view full code here – LainIwakura Jun 23 '11 at 4:09
    
I don't remember anything about _t being standards reserved - in fact wchar_t was named after the most common name for the prestandard typedefs people were using. I could be wrong though! – Simon Buchan Jun 23 '11 at 4:25
    
@Simon: I knew it was reserved by a standard, but not exactly by which. A little search yielded me the link I edited in - it's POSIX. – Xeo Jun 23 '11 at 4:28
    
Ah, nice to know! thanks! – Simon Buchan Jun 23 '11 at 4:29

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