Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to read blocks from a file and I have a problem.

char* inputBuffer = new char[blockSize]
while (inputFile.read(inputBuffer, blockSize)) {
    int i = inputFile.gcount();
//Do stuff
}

Suppose our block size is 1024 bytes, and the file is 24,3 KiB. After reading the 23rd block, there will be 0,3 KiB left to read. I also want to read that 0,3 KiB, in fact I use gcount() later so I can know how much of the buffer did read(...) modify (in case if it is less).
But when it accesses the 24th block, read(...) returns a value such that the program does not enter the loop, obviously because the size of the remaining unread bytes in the file is less than the buffer size. What should I do?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think that Konrad Rudolf who you talk about in the comment to another answer makes a good point about the problem with reading until eof. If you never reach eof because of some other error you are in an infinite loop. So take his advice, but modify it to address the problem you have identified. One way of doing it is as follows;

bool okay=true;
while ( okay ) {
    okay = inputFile.read(inputBuffer, blockSize);
    int i = inputFile.gcount();
    if( i ) {
        //Do stuff
    }
}

Edit: Since my answer has been accepted, I am editing it to be as useful as possible. It turns out my bool okay is quite unnecessary (see ferosekhanj's answer). It is better to test the value of inputFile directly, that also has the advantage that you can elegantly avoid entering the loop if the file did not open okay. So I think this is the canonical solution to this problem;

inputFile.open( "test.txt", ios::binary );
while ( inputFile ) {
    inputFile.read( inputBuffer, blockSize );
    int i = inputFile.gcount();
    if( i ) {
        //Do stuff
    }
}

Now the last time you //Do stuff, i will be less than blockSize, except in the case that the file happens to be a multiple of blockSize bytes long.

Konrad Rudolf's answer here is also good, it has the advantage that .gcount() is only called once, outside the loop, but the disadvantage that it really needs data processing to be put in a separate function, to avoid duplication.

share|improve this answer
    
You should include an if (okay) after the "okay = inputFile.read(...)" so you assure that the program will never work with invalid data. Do it so I mark this as an accepted answer. –  Erandros Jun 23 '11 at 5:18
    
@Erandos, no that won't work because then you are back to square 1 - you won't process the last subsized block! Instead perhaps add if(i), so that you only Do Stuff if there is data. –  Bill Forster Jun 23 '11 at 5:22
    
You're right. I still think there should be a "if (lessThanBufferSizeFlag)". I don't know how to obtain that flag value though. –  Erandros Jun 23 '11 at 5:26
    
@Erandos, I added the if(i). i will only be non-zero when data has been read successfully. The only case where i is non-zero but less than blockSize is when reading the final, odd sized fragment, but now you get to process that data, which is what you really want. –  Bill Forster Jun 23 '11 at 5:28
1  
if( i>0 && i<blockSize ) is the same as if( lessThanBufferSizeFlag ). Adding too many flags to an API is counterproductive, getting the API details complete, elegant, necessary and sufficient is an artform! –  Bill Forster Jun 23 '11 at 5:31

The solution @Konrad Rudolph mentioned is to check for the stream object itself since that includes checking for eof and error condition. The inputFile.read() returns the stream that is inputFile itself so you can write like

while(inputFile.read())

But this will not work always. The case where it fails is your case. A proper solution would be to write like below

char* inputBuffer = new char[blockSize]
while (inputFile) 
{
    inputFile.read(inputBuffer, blockSize);
    int count = inputFile.gcount();
    //Access the buffer until count bytes
    //Do stuff
}

I think this was the solution what @Konrad Rudolph meant in his post. From my old CPP experience I also would do something like above.

share|improve this answer
    
This works too. –  Erandros Jun 23 '11 at 5:29
    
I agree actually, this is an improvement over my solution, so +1 well done. –  Bill Forster Jun 23 '11 at 5:35
    
The one (very slight) advantage that my solution has over yours is that I only need to check gcount once, after the loop (inside the loop it will always be equal to blockSize). And I really dislike performing unnecessary operations, even if they are cheap. That said, your solution is superior as soon as processing the buffer becomes nontrivial (= more than a single statement). –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 23 '11 at 9:17

But when it accesses the 24th block, read(...) returns a value such that the program does not enter the loop, obviously because the size of the remaining unread bytes in the file is less than the buffer size.

That's because your loop is wrong. You should be doing:

while(!inputFile) {
    std::streamsize numBytes = inputFile.readsome(inputBuffer, blockSize);
//Do stuff
}

Notice the use of readsome instead of read.

share|improve this answer
    
That loop is wrong? This 100K rep man says the opposite: stackoverflow.com/questions/6444876/c-reading-buffer-size/… I will try that readsome though. –  Erandros Jun 23 '11 at 4:17
1  
@Erandros: He also says that putting the read inside the while condition is "more readable," which is something I would contest. Condition statements doing actual work may be an established idiom in C/C++, but it's not necessarily a good or readable one. –  Nicol Bolas Jun 23 '11 at 4:43
    
I agree on the "more readable" issue. But, what happens if I do readsome and fails? I'll keep doing stuff with corrupt data. Ensuring that it will never happen was the upside of that while. –  Erandros Jun 23 '11 at 4:47
2  
This is not a good solution because, as Konrad Rudolf points out in the link Erandros gives to one of his comments, if the inputFile has other problems then it will never reach eof and you will be stuck in an infinite loop, so -1 sorry. ferosekhanj has the best answer –  Bill Forster Jun 23 '11 at 5:40
    
@Nicola In general I would agree with you assessment that loop conditionals shouldn’t do work. However, since this is an established idiom in C++, reading from a stream is an exception. The fact that’s an idiom makes it readable (because it’s what an experienced programmer expects). Anyway, checking for eof is insufficient. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 23 '11 at 9:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.