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I have considered using this shortcut in my competition programming. I define a function:

private static int[] range(int n) {
    int[] ret = new int[n];
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        ret[i] = i;
    }
    return ret;
}

so that I can write my for loops slightly quicker, and slightly neater looking (when scanning code):

for (int i: range(n)) { doit(i); }

instead of:

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) { doit(i); }

Are there any significant performance issues with this approach and what are they?

The code has a time limit to calculate a solution, but using the right algorithm it's usually possible to do this in a fraction of the time limit. The range function runs in O(n) and because we are going to run a O(n) loop anyway, there is no increase in time complexity. What about garbage collection? Anything else I'm not thinking of?

I will determine if I actually like using this method later, and if it's worth the overhead of typing out the functions at the start of the competition. Please don't answer about the style. (Competition coding produces some of the worst looking code you've ever seen, but it's all about getting it done on time and never looking at it again.)


To clarify, actual coding time is crucial in this competition and we can't bring pre-typed code. This generally means no code snippets either. The foreach will make for loops quicker to type, and less error prone, in the rushed and messy coding environment. It is an alternative to macros in C++.

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1  
Unless n is large enough to cause issues with space allocation... I don't see any downsides. I actually ended up implementing similar functionality for my own purposes but with an iterator instead of an array. The array method should be faster at least for small n. –  trutheality Jun 23 '11 at 6:07
    
Add a code snippet for for over an array into your editor. Some clever IDEs will even list the arrays for you to choose from and add .length for you. –  Koterpillar Jun 23 '11 at 6:20
    
@Koterpillar, unfortunately we don't compete on our own computer, so this may not be an option. –  BudgieInWA Jun 23 '11 at 9:02

4 Answers 4

I would prefer to do it this way, in this kinda situation.

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) { doit(i); }

Converting it to an array is not really giving any benefit, IMO. Performance is not much of a concern for me here, may be it will be but second. First, I don't do that because its about writing one more method, which is giving nothing much. Moreover, why execute 2 loops when just 1 would have been sufficient.

In case you will write many many for-loops, then foreach loop might not be suitable for every situation and you might end up using traditional for-loop, anyway, perhaps most of the time. You must consider the problems we usually get in programming competition. You might need the index in the loop to do some calculation. Who knows. Further, I didn't find myself not too slow in coming up with for-loop before foreach came into Java.

Moreover, in competition we usually we don't care about performance, unless its mentioned explicitly. And if it is, your workaround would not be taken very positively.

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Agree. I don't see the point of it. And if n is VERY large there will be a slight performance hit ( even though it's technically still O(n) as we discard the 2 from 2*O(n)) –  Steve Jun 23 '11 at 6:24
    
In the competition environment, I will write many many for loops and this method might be good enough to save some time/stress over the course of the competition. The foreach looks nicer, for straight cut for loops. I am asking about any performance issues that I may have overlooked, not style advice. –  BudgieInWA Jun 23 '11 at 8:45
    
@BudgielnWA: In case you will write many many for-loops, then foreach look loop might not be suitable for all that and you end up using traditional for-loop anyway. You must consider the problems we usually get in programming competition. You might need the index in the loop to do some calculation. Who knows. Further, I didn't find myself not too slow in coming up with for-loop before foreach came into Java. –  Adeel Ansari Jun 23 '11 at 8:59
    
I wouldn't use foreach everywhere, just where it's a clear cut, "i in range 0 to n-1" for loop. I am well aware of the differences between the two and how to apply them. –  BudgieInWA Jun 23 '11 at 12:08
1  
@BudgielnWA: If you are very tempted to do so, go ahead. Performance may not be a criteria there. If it is then avoid this trick completely, I would say. –  Adeel Ansari Jun 23 '11 at 14:24

For small array it will not be an issue (you may just benchmark it if you not sure).

Where is better way to do same thing. Foreach loop can iterate over Iterable instances. You can ccreate class RangeIterable implements Iterable, and make static method RangeIterable range(int from, int to), like you do. It'll be a little more OOP-way, and it's cheeper in terms of memory. And even integer boxing will not be an issue for ranges inside [-127,128], which is default range for precach Integer instances

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I like the idea of using a custom Iterable class instead of an array (for the memory). I will look into doing that with as little code as possible :) Hopefully it's feasible for my situation. –  BudgieInWA Jun 23 '11 at 9:01
    
Just keep in mind what in this case you'll iterate over Integer, not int, and, although we have auto boxing/unboxing since 1.5, where still exists some issues about using Integers as ints (some corner cases about priority of boxing/unboxing). And, sure, you can cache RangeIterators for frequently used ranges -- exactly as jdk cache Integers for [-127..128]. –  BegemoT Jun 23 '11 at 16:24

I would suggest use of:

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) { doit(i); }

if you are looking for fast execution time.

Other approach will consume time in performing array look-up and copying values when assigning value to i.

I tried to run a quick test to verify:

class Main {
private static int[] range(int n) {
  int[] ret = new int[n];
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    ret[i] = i;
  }
  return ret;
}

public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception
{
  int n = 10;
  for(int x =0; x<3; x++){

  int[] ret = range(n);
  long t1 = System.nanoTime() ;
  for (int i: ret ) { }
  long t2 = System.nanoTime() ;
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) { }
  long t3 = System.nanoTime() ;
  System.out.println(n + " : " + (t2-t1));
  System.out.println(n + " : " + (t3-t2));
  n = n*n;
  }  
  }
  }

The result obtained is:

10 : 1382
10 : 728
100 : 5239
100 : 1774
10000 : 450105
10000 : 1741059
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Thanks for the effort. I have run your tests a bunch of time on my machine too, and after a number of runs the foreach seems to be about 1.5 times slower for those values of n. This is good to know, but wont often cause problems in my situation. –  BudgieInWA Jun 23 '11 at 12:05

I don't think that creating an array will improve the performace.

You also might want to look at this:

Premature optimization is the root of all evil

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He never meant that, Zoltan :). –  Adeel Ansari Jun 23 '11 at 7:32
    
Of course it wont improve performance. The idea is to improve my typing/debugging performance, without making my solutions excessively slow. –  BudgieInWA Jun 23 '11 at 8:53

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