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I'm sure this has to do with scope, but I always seem to struggle with javascript scope.

Anyway here is the code ...

var beaches = [
      ['Surf Spot One', xxxxxx, xxxxxx, 2],
      ['Surf Spot Two', xxxxxx, xxxxxx, 1],
      ['Surf Spot Three', xxxxxx, xxxxxx, 3 ]
    ];
    var marker = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < beaches.length; i++) {
      var pos = new google.maps.LatLng(beaches[i][1], beaches[i][2]);
      marker[i] = new google.maps.Marker({
          setClickable: 1,
          position: pos,
          map: map,
          icon: surferDude,
          title:beaches[i][0]
      });
        google.maps.event.addListener(marker[i], 'mouseover', function() {
            // do something here on mouseover
                        console.log(i);
            });
    }

The output in the console on mouseover is always 3? Why is this? I need it to be 1 or 2 or 3 depending on which icon I'm mouseing over.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, it is about scope. When the callback gets called, it will be using the last value of i rather than the value of i when you add the listener. The anonymous function that you're building is a closure that captures the i variable without evaluating it, i won't be evaluated until the callback is called and by that time, i will be 3.

The usual closure busting solution should work:

function create_listener(i) {
    return function() {
        console.log(i);
    };
}
//...
google.maps.event.addListener(marker[i], 'mouseover', create_listener(i));

You could also use a self-executing function instead of a separate create_listener but that might be too noisy.

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Thanks for this. I really struggle with scope in javascript. –  32423hjh32423 Jun 23 '11 at 6:15
    
@neilc: Closures do take some getting used to. A general rule is that you'll probably need a trick like create_listener when you create a closure or callback inside a loop. Funny how you can never get away from pointers even in languages that claim not to have them :) –  mu is too short Jun 23 '11 at 6:20

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