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How do I get the timestamp from the MongoDB id?

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1  
Just as an FYI, the second answer should probably be the accepted answer. It's implemented in any JS driver that uses the native MongoDB JS Driver (which is all of them that I know of). –  Dropped.on.Caprica Feb 6 '14 at 20:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted

The timestamp is contained in the first 4 bytes of a mongoDB id (see: http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Object+IDs).

So your timestamp is:

timestamp = _id.toString().substring(0,8)

and

date = new Date( parseInt( timestamp, 16 ) * 1000 )
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As of Mongo 2.2, this has changed (see: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/core/object-id/)

You can do this all in one step inside of the mongo shell:

document._id.getTimestamp();

This will return a Date object.

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1  
It's implemented by mongojs (github.com/gett/mongojs) as well. –  julien_c Sep 2 '13 at 10:22
    
Also python: document_id.generation_time –  Joe May 22 '14 at 11:24

Get the timestamp from a mongoDB collection item, with walkthrough:

The timestamp is buried deep within the bowels of the mongodb object. Follow along and stay frosty.

Login to mongodb shell

ubuntu@ip-10-0-1-223:~$ mongo 10.0.1.223
MongoDB shell version: 2.4.9
connecting to: 10.0.1.223/test

Create your database by inserting items

> db.penguins.insert({"penguin": "skipper"})
> db.penguins.insert({"penguin": "kowalski"})
> 

Check if it is there:

> show dbs
local      0.078125GB
penguins   0.203125GB

Lets make that database the one we are on now

> use penguins
switched to db penguins

Get yourself an ISODate:

> ISODate("2013-03-01")
ISODate("2013-03-01T00:00:00Z")

Print some json:

> printjson({"foo":"bar"})
{ "foo" : "bar" }

Get the rows back:

> db.penguins.find()
{ "_id" : ObjectId("5498da1bf83a61f58ef6c6d5"), "penguin" : "skipper" }
{ "_id" : ObjectId("5498da28f83a61f58ef6c6d6"), "penguin" : "kowalski" }

We only want to inspect one row

> db.penguins.findOne()
{ "_id" : ObjectId("5498da1bf83a61f58ef6c6d5"), "penguin" : "skipper" }

Get the _id of that row:

> db.penguins.findOne()._id
ObjectId("5498da1bf83a61f58ef6c6d5")

Get the timestamp from the _id object:

> db.penguins.findOne()._id.getTimestamp()
ISODate("2014-12-23T02:57:31Z")

Get the timestamp of the last added record:

> db.penguins.find().sort({_id:-1}).limit(1).forEach(function (doc){ print(doc._id.getTimestamp()) })
Tue Dec 23 2014 03:04:53 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Example loop, print strings:

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ print("hi") })
hi
hi

Example loop, same as find(), print the rows

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ printjson(doc) })
{ "_id" : ObjectId("5498dbc9f83a61f58ef6c6d7"), "penguin" : "skipper" }
{ "_id" : ObjectId("5498dbd5f83a61f58ef6c6d8"), "penguin" : "kowalski" }

Loop, get the system date:

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ doc["timestamp_field"] = new Date(); printjson(doc); })
{
        "_id" : ObjectId("5498dbc9f83a61f58ef6c6d7"),
        "penguin" : "skipper",
        "timestamp_field" : ISODate("2014-12-23T03:15:56.257Z")
}
{
        "_id" : ObjectId("5498dbd5f83a61f58ef6c6d8"),
        "penguin" : "kowalski",
        "timestamp_field" : ISODate("2014-12-23T03:15:56.258Z")
}

Loop, get the date of each row:

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ doc["timestamp_field"] = doc._id.getTimestamp(); printjson(doc); })
{
        "_id" : ObjectId("5498dbc9f83a61f58ef6c6d7"),
        "penguin" : "skipper",
        "timestamp_field" : ISODate("2014-12-23T03:04:41Z")
}
{
        "_id" : ObjectId("5498dbd5f83a61f58ef6c6d8"),
        "penguin" : "kowalski",
        "timestamp_field" : ISODate("2014-12-23T03:04:53Z")
}

Filter down to just the dates

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ doc["timestamp_field"] = doc._id.getTimestamp(); printjson(doc["timestamp_field"]); })
ISODate("2014-12-23T03:04:41Z")
ISODate("2014-12-23T03:04:53Z")

Filterdown further for just the strings:

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ doc["timestamp_field"] = doc._id.getTimestamp(); print(doc["timestamp_field"]) })
Tue Dec 23 2014 03:04:41 GMT+0000 (UTC)
Tue Dec 23 2014 03:04:53 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Print a bare date, get its type, assign a date:

> print(new Date())
Tue Dec 23 2014 03:30:49 GMT+0000 (UTC)
> typeof new Date()
object
> new Date("11/21/2012");
ISODate("2012-11-21T00:00:00Z")

Convert instance of date to yyyy-MM-dd

> print(d.getFullYear()+"-"+(d.getMonth()+1)+"-"+d.getDate())
2014-1-1

get it in yyyy-MM-dd format for each row:

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ d = doc._id.getTimestamp(); print(d.getFullYear()+"-"+(d.getMonth()+1)+"-"+d.getDate()) })
2014-12-23
2014-12-23

the toLocaleDateString is briefer:

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ d = doc._id.getTimestamp(); print(d.toLocaleDateString()) })
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Get each row in yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss format:

> db.penguins.find().forEach(function (doc){ d = doc._id.getTimestamp(); print(d.getFullYear()+"-"+(d.getMonth()+1)+"-"+d.getDate() + " " + d.getHours() + ":" + d.getMinutes() + ":" + d.getSeconds()) })
2014-12-23 3:4:41
2014-12-23 3:4:53

Get the date of the last added row:

> db.penguins.find().sort({_id:-1}).limit(1).forEach(function (doc){ print(doc._id.getTimestamp()) })
Tue Dec 23 2014 03:04:53 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Drop the database when you are done:

> use penguins
switched to db penguins
> db.dropDatabase()
{ "dropped" : "penguins", "ok" : 1 }

Make sure it's gone:

> show dbs
local   0.078125GB
test    (empty)

The aliens are coming, only your MongoDB proficiency can save us.

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Here is a quick php function for you all ;)

public static function makeDate($mongoId) {

    $timestamp = intval(substr($mongoId, 0, 8), 16);

    $datum = (new DateTime())->setTimestamp($timestamp);

    return $datum->format('d/m/Y');
}
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