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I'm modifying an init.d script for one of my company apps. Apparently my bash script foo is not strong enough.

Once the Launcher has seen the Dispatcher has terminated, it will exit. The vanilla script always displays [ FAILED ] when stopping the app as the Launcher has terminated before this script tries to kill it.

I've tried to add in a 2 second grace period (plenty) for the Launcher to terminate before attempting to kill it if it's still running.

I have the following stop() function:

#!/bin/bash
# chkconfig: 345 85 60
# description: .
# processname: xxx
# pidfile: /var/run/xxx.pid

# Source function library.
. /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions

RETVAL=0

PID_PATH=/tmp/
PID_PREFIX=xxx
LOCK_PATH=/tmp/

PIDFILE_D=${PID_PATH}${PID_PREFIX}_dispatcher.pid
PIDFILE_L=${PID_PATH}${PID_PREFIX}_launcher.pid
PIDFILE_J=${PID_PATH}${PID_PREFIX}_jobselector.pid
LOCK=${LOCK_PATH}${PID_PREFIX}

BASEPATH=`dirname $0`
echo $BASEPATH | grep -q "^/" && BASEPATH=`dirname $BASEPATH` || BASEPATH=$PWD/`dirname $BASEPATH`

# -- snip ---

stop() {
        echo -n $"Shutting down Dispatcher: "
        killproc -p $PIDFILE_D
        RETVAL=$?
        echo
        [ $RETVAL -eq 0 ] && rm -f $PIDFILE_D

        echo -n $"Shutting down Launcher: "

        # launcher self terminates once it sees the dispatcher is not running
        # grace period of 2 seconds before explicitly killing it
        if [ -e "$PIDFILE_L" ]; then
            local i pid
            read pid < "$PIDFILE_L"
            for i in 1 2; do
                if checkpid $pid 2>&1; then
                    sleep 1
                fi
            done

            # if launcher still active after grace period, kill it
            if checkpid $pid 2>&1; then
                killproc -p $PIDFILE_L
                RETVAL=$?
            else
                success $"$base shutdown"
            fi
        else
            success $"$base shutdown"
        fi
        [ $RETVAL -eq 0 ] && rm -f $PIDFILE_L

        echo -n $"Shutting down Job Selector: "
        killproc -p $PIDFILE_J
        RETVAL=$?
        echo
        [ $RETVAL -eq 0 ] && rm -f $PIDFILE_J

        [ $RETVAL -eq 0 ] && rm -f $LOCK
        return $RETVAL
}

When I stop the program, it doesn't display the "Shutting down Launcher: ... " line anymore.

$ sudo ./bin/program stop
Shutting down Dispatcher:                             [  OK  ]
Shutting down Job Selector:                           [  OK  ]

Supporting functions:

killproc() {
        local RC killlevel= base pid pid_file= delay

        RC=0; delay=3
        # Test syntax.
        if [ "$#" -eq 0 ]; then
                echo $"Usage: killproc [-p pidfile] [ -d delay] {program} [-signal]"
                return 1
        fi
        if [ "$1" = "-p" ]; then
                pid_file=$2
                shift 2
        fi
        if [ "$1" = "-d" ]; then
                delay=$2
                shift 2
        fi

        # check for second arg to be kill level
        [ -n "${2:-}" ] && killlevel=$2

        # Save basename.
        base=${1##*/}

        # Find pid.
        __pids_var_run "$1" "$pid_file"
        if [ -z "$pid_file" -a -z "$pid" ]; then
                pid="$(__pids_pidof "$1")"
        fi

        # Kill it.
        if [ -n "$pid" ] ; then
                [ "$BOOTUP" = "verbose" -a -z "${LSB:-}" ] && echo -n "$base "
                if [ -z "$killlevel" ] ; then
                       if checkpid $pid 2>&1; then
                           # TERM first, then KILL if not dead
                           kill -TERM $pid >/dev/null 2>&1
                           usleep 100000
                           if checkpid $pid && sleep 1 &&
                              checkpid $pid && sleep $delay &&
                              checkpid $pid ; then
                                kill -KILL $pid >/dev/null 2>&1
                                usleep 100000
                           fi
                        fi
                        checkpid $pid
                        RC=$?
                        [ "$RC" -eq 0 ] && failure $"$base shutdown" || success $"$base shutdown"
                        RC=$((! $RC))
                # use specified level only
                else
                        if checkpid $pid; then
                                kill $killlevel $pid >/dev/null 2>&1
                                RC=$?
                                [ "$RC" -eq 0 ] && success $"$base $killlevel" || failure $"$base $killlevel"
                        elif [ -n "${LSB:-}" ]; then
                                RC=7 # Program is not running
                        fi
                fi
        else
                if [ -n "${LSB:-}" -a -n "$killlevel" ]; then
                        RC=7 # Program is not running
                else
                        failure $"$base shutdown"
                        RC=0
                fi
        fi

        # Remove pid file if any.
        if [ -z "$killlevel" ]; then
            rm -f "${pid_file:-/var/run/$base.pid}"
        fi
        return $RC
}

# Check if $pid (could be plural) are running
checkpid() {
        local i

        for i in $* ; do
                [ -d "/proc/$i" ] && return 0
        done
        return 1
}

# Log that something succeeded
success() {
  #if [ -z "${IN_INITLOG:-}" ]; then
  #   initlog $INITLOG_ARGS -n $0 -s "$1" -e 1
  #fi
  [ "$BOOTUP" != "verbose" -a -z "${LSB:-}" ] && echo_success
  return 0
}

echo_success() {
  [ "$BOOTUP" = "color" ] && $MOVE_TO_COL
  echo -n "["
  [ "$BOOTUP" = "color" ] && $SETCOLOR_SUCCESS
  echo -n $"  OK  "
  [ "$BOOTUP" = "color" ] && $SETCOLOR_NORMAL
  echo -n "]"
  echo -ne "\r"
  return 0
}

What is the relevance of $ is in the echo line?

echo -n $"Shutting down Launcher: "

If I add in the debug line:

echo "RETVAL=$RETVAL"
[ $RETVAL -eq 0 ] && rm -f $PIDFILE_L

I get:

Shutting down Dispatcher:                             [FAILED]
RETVAL=0 down Launcher:                               [  OK  ]
Shutting down Job Selector:                           [FAILED]

Any bash script gurus out there?

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Turns out all I needed was an echo statement before the following line.

echo
[ $RETVAL -eq 0 ] && rm -f $PIDFILE_L

This is related to my question about the behaviour of echo -n $"Shutting down Launcher".

The echo -n switch supresses the line feed character \n. The $ preceding the quotes outputs carriage return \r to move the cursor back to the beginning of the line.

Without the echo statement, the Job Selector shutdown line was overwriting the Launcher shutdown line.

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