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I have this situation, I tried to create an example of it, and would like to see if there is any elegant way to fix it.

Suppose I have some Interface Displayable, and implementing Classes :Person and Car, and I have generic Converter class declared like this:

public interface Converter<T extends Displayable> {
    boolean canConvert(Displayable o);
    String convert(T o);
    T decode(String s);
    boolean canRevert(String s);
}

Suppose I have Implementations of this

public class CarConverter implements Converter<Car> { ... }

and

public class PersonConverter implements Converter<Person> { ... }

now in my useage I have a list of Displayable, and a list of converters, and I would like to convert and revert the Displayables:

List<Displayable> ds = new ArrayList<Displayable>();
ds.add(new Person("ma",12));
ds.add(new Person("fa",43));
ds.add(new Car());
ds.add(new Car());
ds.add(new Person("Sol",58));

List<Converter>cs = new ArrayList<Converter>();
cs.add(new CarConverter());
cs.add(new PersonConverter());

        ArrayList<String> displays = new ArrayList<String>();
        for(Displayable d:ds) {
            for(Converter c:cs) {
                if(c.canConvert(d)) {
                    displays.add(c.convert(d));
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        List<Displayable> ret = new ArrayList<Displayable>();

        for(String display : displays) {
            for(Converter c:cs) {
                if(c.canRevert(display)) {
                    Displayable d = c.decode(display);
                    ret.add(d);
                }                
            }
        }

the annoying bit is that I had to declare a list Converters, loosing the generics.

List<Converter>

I get a syntax error if I try to declare

List<Convert<Displayable>>

and then I get a lot of warnings.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you consider List<Converter> to be less specific than List<Converter<Displayable>>? –  SJuan76 Jun 23 '11 at 10:33
    
you have interface name Converter not Converters. –  Asad Rasheed Jun 23 '11 at 10:33
1  
You can state List<? extends Converter<?>> cs = new ArrayList<? extends Converter<?>> but you will have to worry about capture-of where plausible. –  Buhake Sindi Jun 23 '11 at 10:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do this, you just need to make a slight change to your list declaration:

List<Converter<? extends Displayable>> list = ...

This will work for you. The key thing to bear in mind here is that, you can't rely on inheritance in the nested type parameters, you need to declare the extension with extends.

If you have List<Converter<Displayable>> you can only add Converter<Displayable> instances to that list, not Converter<SomethingThatExtendsDisplayable>>.

share|improve this answer
    
that sounds like a good solution, thanks! –  Charbel Jun 23 '11 at 13:05

It looks like the converter is just making a string representation of the displayables. If that's the case, I think what you really want to do is override the toString() method for each Displayable, and give each of them a constructor that takes a display string as an argument. Then you don't need to worry about implementing a separate Converter for each implementation of Displayable. So a Person would look something like:

public class Person implements Displayable {
    public Person(String display) {
        // Make a Person from a display
    }

    public String toString() {
        // Make a display from a person
    }

    ...
}
share|improve this answer

This might be lame, but you do not need generics at all in this situation. Since you already use canConvert and canRevert, additional compile time type checking is not needed.

My quickly fixed code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Displayable> ds = new ArrayList<Displayable>();
    ds.add(new Person("ma", 12));
    ds.add(new Person("fa", 43));
    ds.add(new Car());
    ds.add(new Car());
    ds.add(new Person("Sol", 58));

    ArrayList<Converter> cs = new ArrayList<Converter>();
    cs.add(new CarConverter());
    cs.add(new PersonConverter());

    ArrayList<String> displays = new ArrayList<String>();
    for (Displayable d : ds) {
        for (Converter c : cs) {
            if (c.canConvert(d)) {
                displays.add(c.convert(d));
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    List<Displayable> ret = new ArrayList<Displayable>();

    for (String display : displays) {
        for (Converter c : cs) {
            if (c.canRevert(display)) {
                Displayable d = c.decode(display);
                ret.add(d);
            }
        }
    }
}

.

public class CarConverter implements Converter {

    @Override
    public boolean canConvert(Displayable o) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean canRevert(String s) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public String convert(Displayable o) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public Car decode(String s) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

}

.

package convert;

public interface Converter {
    boolean canConvert(Displayable o);
    String convert(Displayable o);
    Displayable decode(String s);
    boolean canRevert(String s);    
}

Or is there any advantage from generics I'm missing? A more pretty solution would be to include the converter code in the Displayable classes. If you only have one converter for every type, that's more then fine to do.

share|improve this answer
    
in brief, as I noted, the example code, is just to try to explain the problem, my real life usage is much more complicated, and generics are very useful in that situation. Rob's answer is the most elegant. –  Charbel Jun 23 '11 at 13:33
    
Should have figured that much. I tried Rob's solution too, but failed. The example code still gives me the feeling of misuse of generics, but I'm sure your real usage has good justifications for it. Gotta try Rob's solution again tomorrow, i prolly forgot something trivial. –  Dorus Jun 23 '11 at 22:07

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