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There are 10 possible construction sites that I need to account for in my report. However, as my code is now, when a construction site is not in my database, it isn't accounted for at all, which makes sense, but I would prefer it list all of the possible construction sites and put 0 as the value instead of returning nothing. The reason I need to do this is because I am creating reports based off these queries, and it's hard to line everything up unless I consistently have all of the construction sites accounted for every time. Here is the SQL:

TRANSFORM Count(Main.ID) AS CountOfID
SELECT 'Total IDs' AS [Construction site   >>>]
FROM Research INNER JOIN Main ON Research.Primary_ID = Main.ID
GROUP BY 'Total IDs'
PIVOT Research.Construction_site;

By the way, I am using MS Access 2007 is that makes a difference.

Thanks

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If you are using MS Access, why then did you specify mysql in the tags? Was that accidental? –  Andriy M Jun 23 '11 at 11:22
    
No, I just thought someone who knew mysql might know how to do this, but I removed the tag. –  jerry Jun 23 '11 at 11:25
    
Which table lists all the construction sites? –  Andriy M Jun 23 '11 at 11:31
    
The Research table –  jerry Jun 23 '11 at 11:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I'm reading your question correctly, you want all fields from the Research table, regardless of whether they are in the Main table. In which case, you just need a LEFT OUTER JOIN:

TRANSFORM Count(Main.ID) AS CountOfID
SELECT 'Total IDs' AS [Construction site   >>>]
FROM Research LEFT OUTER JOIN Main ON Research.Primary_ID = Main.ID
GROUP BY 'Total IDs'
PIVOT Research.Construction_site;

This will return all rows from the Research table at least once - and multiple times if they exist more than once in the Main table.

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Jet/ACE's SQL dialect ignores the OUTER in LEFT OUTER JOIN, and treats that identically to LEFT JOIN. –  David-W-Fenton Jun 25 '11 at 1:36
    
Good to know, I didn't realise that. So I guess the above is still correct, but can be just LEFT JOIN instead. Thanks for the comment. :) –  Jaymz Jun 27 '11 at 9:21

Most probably you need to replace INNER JOIN with LEFT JOIN. (I.e. simply change 'INNER' to 'LEFT'.) That way the construction sites not represented in Main won't be filtered out.

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This isn't working, does INNER JOIN read the potential values from the Lookup in the Research table? Basically how I have it now is all of the potential values are in the lookup, but when I edit the code, it's still showing only the construction sites that have a value. EDIT: the look up is in the research table –  jerry Jun 23 '11 at 11:55
    
INNER JOIN results in the rows from both sides that match each other. LEFT JOIN returns all the rows that INNER JOIN returns plus those from the left side (Research) that don't have matches in the right table (Main). For such rows, the corresponding columns in the right table have NULLs. –  Andriy M Jun 23 '11 at 12:05
    
That said, I don't really understand why LEFT JOIN didn't work for you. Maybe using it with pivoting has its own peculiarities, not sure. (I've never done pivoting in Access.) –  Andriy M Jun 23 '11 at 12:13

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