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What is the quickest way to HTTP GET in Python if I know the Content will be a string? I am searching the docs for a quick one-liner like:

contents = url.get("http://example.com/foo/bar")

But all I can find using Google are httplib and urllib - and I am unable to find a shortcut in those libraries.

Does standard Python 2.5 have a shortcut in some form as above, or should I write a function url_get?

  1. I would prefer not to capture the output of shelling out to wget or curl.
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8  
One-liners are not necessarily faster. Don't fetishize code golf. You have to measure speed; not lines of code. –  S.Lott Mar 14 '09 at 12:11
7  
uhm, no, I googled in here because I needed to add a line to an experiment I'm writing; not the finished product. CPU time is much, much cheaper than programmer time! –  Phlip Oct 11 '13 at 23:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 151 down vote accepted

Python 2.x:

import urllib2
urllib2.urlopen("http://example.com/foo/bar").read()

Python 3.x:

import urllib.request
urllib.request.urlopen("http://example.com/foo/bar").read()

How is that?

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4  
Does everything get cleaned up nicely? It looks like I should call close after your read. Is that necessary? –  Frank Krueger Mar 14 '09 at 3:49
    
It is good practice to close it, but if you're looking for a quick one-liner, you could omit it. :-) –  Nick Presta Mar 14 '09 at 3:51
    
For what it's worth, the same thing works with urllib in place of urllib2 (at least for most URLs). –  David Z Mar 14 '09 at 4:09
    
The object returned by urlopen will be deleted (and finalized, which closes it) when it falls out of scope. Because Cpython is reference-counted, you can rely on that happening immediately after the read. But a with block would be clearer and safer for Jython, etc. –  sah Dec 27 '13 at 21:05

Have a look at httplib2, which - next to a lot of very useful features - provides exactly what you want.

import httplib2

resp, content = httplib2.Http().request("http://example.com/foo/bar")

Where content would be the response body (as a string), and resp would contain the status and response headers.

It doesn't come included with a standard python install though (but it only requires standard python), but it's definitely worth checking out.

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If you want solution with httplib2 to be oneliner consider instatntinating anonymous Http object

import httplib2
resp, content = httplib2.Http().request("http://example.com/foo/bar")
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Here is a wget script in Python:

# From python cookbook, 2nd edition, page 487
import sys, urllib

def reporthook(a, b, c):
    print "% 3.1f%% of %d bytes\r" % (min(100, float(a * b) / c * 100), c),
for url in sys.argv[1:]:
    i = url.rfind("/")
    file = url[i+1:]
    print url, "->", file
    urllib.urlretrieve(url, file, reporthook)
print
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theller's solution for wget is really useful, however, i found it does not print out the progress throughout the downloading process. It's perfect if you add one line after the print statement in reporthook.

import sys, urllib

def reporthook(a, b, c):
    print "% 3.1f%% of %d bytes\r" % (min(100, float(a * b) / c * 100), c),
    sys.stdout.flush()
for url in sys.argv[1:]:
    i = url.rfind("/")
    file = url[i+1:]
    print url, "->", file
    urllib.urlretrieve(url, file, reporthook)
print
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You could use a library called requests.

import requests
r = requests.get("http://example.com/foo/bar")

This is quite easy. Then you can do like this:

>>> print r.status_code
>>> print r.headers
>>> print r.content
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1  
This library is awesome! –  jeremyjjbrown Aug 22 at 13:36

If you are working with HTTP APIs specifically, there are also more convenient choices such as Nap.

For example, here's how to get gists from Github since May 1st 2014:

from nap.url import Url
api = Url('https://api.github.com')

gists = api.join('gists')
response = gists.get(params={'since': '2014-05-01T00:00:00Z'})
print(response.json())

More examples: https://github.com/kimmobrunfeldt/nap#examples

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