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Say I have a struct like this one:

struct Point {
    int x;
    int y;
}

Say also that I need to declare an initialized Point:

static struct Point origin = {0, 0}

My question is where should I put origin? If I could put it in the header it would look very neat, indeed. However, wouldn't that mean that origin would be created for every source file that uses this header? In other words:

first_file.c

#include "point.h"
point_is_origin(&origin);

second_file.c

#include "point.h"
bool point_is_origin(struct Point *point) {
    return point == &origin;
}

Such approach may be useful if one was trying to implement the Flyweight pattern so it shouldn't be considered meaningless.

My view of the matter is that the better way to resolve this issue is to store the definitions in a separate source file, like so:

point.h

#ifndef POINT_H
#define POINT_H

struct Point {
    int x;
    int y;
}

#endif

point_definitions.h

#ifndef POINT_DEFINITIONS_H
#define POINT_DEFINITIONS_H

#include "point.h"
extern struct Point origin;

#endif

point_definitions.c

#include "point.h"
#include "point_definitions.h"

struct Point origin = {0, 0};

In short: Is the first approach a good practice? Is my approach better? Any recommendations and comments?

I always thought, the second approach is the right one, but after seeing the first approach used throughout drivers in the Linux kernel I really did start to wonder.

Thanks!

I'm a Java man and there's no such issue in Java so I really care about the general opinion of this matter.

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1  
I'm very suspicious about comparison by pointer (?) in point_is_origin (but the argument isn't a pointer...). Otherwise, the second approach looks fine. If you have any other implementation code for your Point struct, the global could go in there, but this is fine. –  Kerrek SB Jun 23 '11 at 12:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Starting from your second proposition, I would merge point.h and point_definitions.h and rename point_definitions.c to point.c.

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1  
In principle it's a question whether everyone who needs to know about Points also needs to know about the origin or not. But practically if that's all there's to it then I'd definitely merge that, too, and try to avoid micro-file creep. –  Kerrek SB Jun 23 '11 at 12:13
    
Yes, perfect idea. Now you mention it seems pretty obvious. By the way, I'm using the extern keyword correctly in the header, right? :-) Thanks :-) –  Albus Dumbledore Jun 23 '11 at 12:23
    
Yes, it is correct. –  mouviciel Jun 23 '11 at 12:26

Defining data in header files is a bad practice in C programming, just as bad as putting function definitions in header files.

Header files should only contain public macro definitions, type definitions, function and data prototypes.

A rule of thumb is that when a header file is included, it shouldn't affect the outputted executable. Headers should rather provide hints to the compiler, not any code or data.

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Overly complicated, and most likely incorrect. Testing structs for equality doesn't work by just writing ==, unless they point to the exact same object (read: memory location). You have to compare member by member. This function is a lot easier to implement:

bool point_is_origin(struct Point *point) {
    return point->x == 0 && point->y == 0;
}

If you really want to detect if a point is the origin, just expose the origin object (it's const anyway) and write point == origin instead of point_is_origin(point). The first is perfectly fine syntacticly and semantically.

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point->x, you mean :) –  Diego Sevilla Jun 23 '11 at 12:09
    
Oh dear :) I'll fix it. –  orlp Jun 23 '11 at 12:10
    
If part of the flyweight pattern, testing pointers instead of values may be a big advantage (for text comparison for instance) so it is not an imaginary usecase. –  Albus Dumbledore Jun 23 '11 at 12:19

I like better joining point.h and point_definitions.h in the same file, and then having point.c to have origin. If you have many files it would be more concise.

Note also that you cannot (should not) implemente the equality with origin this way. You should compare both x and y to see if they're equal to those of origin (now you're supposing they are occupying exactly the same location in memory... quite unlikely).

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See my comment about the flyweight pattern about the reason I may do such comparison. –  Albus Dumbledore Jun 23 '11 at 12:20

Of course, yours is better for the following reasons: 1. In the first approach, if two different .c files both contain point.h in one project, then you'll get a multiple definition compile error. 2. In the second approach, the variable is defined in the .c file, it will work properly.

By the way, in C++, you should avoid using global variables, if you use, just put it in the main.cc, it's a good way

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In C++ Can't I just use global vars defined in a namespace? –  Albus Dumbledore Jun 23 '11 at 12:20
    
Of course you can, but it is not a good practice. –  小武哥 Jun 23 '11 at 12:22
    
As far as C++ goes, what I actually meant is declaring static variables for a class, like one would do it in Java. I've been dabbling with C for a few months and I'm beginning to loose a bit of my OOP focus. –  Albus Dumbledore Jun 23 '11 at 12:25
1  
Yes, you can declaring static variables for a class, but static variables will make a class having a state, it's also not a good practice for OOP languages like C++, unless you do want a class to have a state. –  小武哥 Jun 23 '11 at 12:36
1  
You're welcome~~~ –  小武哥 Jun 23 '11 at 12:48

I like your approach. Now let me argue myself out of it.

The world of "predefined points" may be domain-specific, as opposed to points in general.

Your point definitions file may come to include coordinates for Timbuktu or the Phase-change of CO2. Sounds application-specific.

On the other hand... the conventional origin or (0,0) is common to pretty much every use of point. Having that right in point.h & point.c is probably handy for everyone. And as others pointed out, comparing the address of origin isn't what you probably want. The origin is special enough, the function should probably return p && p->x == 0 && p->y == 0;.

Assuming you're not planning to move the origin!

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