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I have a background image centered that Chrome displays offset by one pixel.

CSS

#container { 
    background: url("images/header.jpg") no-repeat scroll 50% transparent;
    width: 100%
}
#header {
    width: 986px;
    margin: 100px auto 0 auto;
}

HTML

<html>
<body>
    <div id="container">
        <div id="header">centered content</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

I guess it has to do with how different browsers handle the center -or 50%- property of the background in CSS:

enter image description here

Is there a known (simple) hack or alternative method to fix this? Background container has to be 100% wide.

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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For me, this did the trick:

@media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) { 

html {
    margin-left: 1px;
}

}

I will post the link for this solution as soon as I find were I got it from a few days ago. In the same post, the guy said the problem was with odd or even number for container width. Anyway, this fixed the problem in my case.

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neat! the media query is the key, but in my case the code was: @media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) { #container { background-position: 49.9% top; } } (change the answer if you can) –  Naoise Golden Jul 6 '11 at 17:29
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If you can output your image wider than the browser window, that should fix it.

If found that solution here - http://philfreo.com/blog/fixing-safaris-1px-background-image-centering-problem/

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If you make the background image width an odd number (987px) the positioning will be consistent across all browsers. It seems counter-intuitive but that seems to always fix the issue for me without any CSS hacks.

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This worked great for me! Thanks Demian. –  Tim Banks Dec 14 '12 at 15:51
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Is the image actually 986px? The easiest way I found to fix it is to make sure the width of the image is an even number.

Another thing you could do is add a 2px buffer (to keep the width an even number) in the background image to account for that shift. It shouldn't shift your image as viewed in the browser as long as you add a px to each side to keep it all even.

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thank you for your reply. The background is 986px, but I don't understand how making it even would work... then it woul appear off-balance in other browsers that now render it correctly. Also, could you please explain me about adding a 2px buffer? Thank you –  Naoise Golden Jun 27 '11 at 14:12
    
@Naoise - In my experience, it doesn't affect the other browsers if you add or remove a pixel to make the width an even number. What I mean by adding a "buffer" is to add a pixel on either side of the image (making it 988px wide, instead of 986px wide) that continues the image (so the curved corner would continue down and the gray side would extend out a pixel). Keep the div at 986px, so the other browsers will cut off the image where needed. –  Shauna Jun 27 '11 at 14:36
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Try resizing the browser to see how it works... we are talking about pixels here, and if the window has a even width it's ok, otherwise a pixel has to be lost somewhere i guess.

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yeah, resizing makes it fit correctly some times... but most of the time is out-balance. This is because how Chrome calculates decimals in pixels... I was hoping some well-known fix. –  Naoise Golden Jun 27 '11 at 14:10
    
How about a 99% or you can try 99.9999% maybe. –  Jose Faeti Jun 27 '11 at 18:45
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I suppose the backgroud image is also 986 pixels wide? Then this effect should also be visible on the left side, turned around though.

I suggest to remove the background image from the container and add it to the header:

#container {
    width: 100%;
}
#header {
    width: 986px;
    background: url("images/header.jpg") no-repeat scroll 50% transparent;
    margin: 100px auto 0 auto;
}
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background container has to be 100% wide, thus it can't go in #header –  Naoise Golden Jun 27 '11 at 14:05
    
@Naoise Golden If the background image is 986 pixels wide, then you can add it centered to the header. I'll edit my answer to clarify. –  NGLN Jun 27 '11 at 14:30
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I used the following bit of CSS to fix the problem on webkit. If JS isn't enabled, it works on the assumption that the browser will probably be full screen, so the viewport width on webkit will be an odd number

CSS

@media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) { 
    html {
        margin-left: 1px;
    }
    html.evenWidth {
        margin-left: 0px;
    }
}

JavaScript (jquery)

$(document).ready(function {
var oWindow = $(window),
htmlEl = $('html');

function window_width() {
    if(oWindow.width() % 2 == 0) {
        htmlEl.addClass('evenWidth');
    } else {
        htmlEl.removeClass('evenWidth');
    }
}

$(document).ready(function(){
    window_width();
    $(window).resize(window_width);
});
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