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base = function () {
  this.A = function () {
    this.B();
  }
  var C = function () {
    alert('I am C');
  }
}

sub = function () {
  this.B = function () {
    C();
  }
}

sub.prototype = new base();

(new sub()).A();

How can I tell the call to B() to evaluate with respect to the base class? (i.e. call c of the base class) Is this impossible?

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Is there a particular reason you don't wish to do this.C = function(){...} and call it as this.C()? –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '11 at 12:50
    
That would allow C to be called on instances / essentially expose it. There's no reason for it to be exposed since it's supposed to be a helper method. I guess you could say my main frustration is that helper methods can't be inherited by subclasses. –  Jiawei Li Jun 23 '11 at 12:53
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Normally I would recommend myFunc.apply and myFunc.eval; that's what I interpret as "with respect to the base class" in javascript.

However based on your title, you say "inside base class scope"; if I assume correctly that you are talking about closures and being able to refer to variables in outer functions, this is impossible, except perhaps with keeping an entrypoint into the closure into which you can pass in requests eval-style... but if you do that, you might as well have a an object like this._private.C.

If you are attempting to keep things "private", it is not really worth bothering to do so in javascript.

If you say your motivation for this.C = function(){...} and access it as this.C(), I may be able to give a clearer answer.

"That would allow C to be called on instances / essentially expose it. There's no reason for it to be exposed since it's supposed to be a helper method. I guess you could say my main frustration is that helper methods can't be inherited by subclasses." --OP

In that case, it really isn't private. However what you can do is define your helper method where it belongs: appropriately in an outer scope. =) For example:

(function(){

  var C = function () {
    alert('I am C');
  }

  base = function () {
    this.A = function () {
      this.B();
    }
  }

  sub = function () {
    this.B = function () {
      C();
    }
  }

})();

sub.prototype = new base();

(new sub()).A();
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, call and apply is the key to invoke prototype object's method –  YODA Jun 23 '11 at 12:40
    
@ninjagecko You, sir, are a genius (or maybe I'm still a javascript newbie). That outer scope was exactly what I was looking for. –  Jiawei Li Jun 23 '11 at 13:03
    
@jiaweihli: no problem, I still wouldn't recommend stressing too much about hiding internals in javascript. Somewhat relatedly, though you don't seem to be a newbie at all, you should also be aware of the most common javascript pitfall: if you do any kind of iteration with .map or $.each or for loops, you will often need to write anonymous functions because only one variable with a single name is ever created per function. This is often noticed if defining callbacks in a loop. –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '11 at 13:13
    
@ninjagecko Yes, JavaScript garden taught me that (and I learned it the hard way) :) I do have a minor quibble with your solution after thinking about it for a while. When C is placed outside both classes, it's no longer able to access the private variables within them (hence breaking its ability to be a 'helper' function). –  Jiawei Li Jun 23 '11 at 13:19
    
@jiaweihli: that would be, I think, perhaps a use-case for C.call(this, arg1,arg2,...)? which would allow C to access this.something. --alternatively-- You might also be able to just declare var C where it is currently, and later define C = function(){...} inside the scope of base! This would probably not do what you want though. –  ninjagecko Jun 23 '11 at 13:22
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You can't, at least not without changing the base class.

C has lexical scope within base, so is only visible when called by other methods defined within the same scope. It's currently a truly private method.

C can only be accessed outside of its lexical scope if it's declared as this.C instead of var C.

See http://jsfiddle.net/alnitak/DaSEN/

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It seems somehow ironic to me that I can access C() while evaluating A() since I am within the scope of the base class, but since it travels back down the prototype chain when calling this.B(), I can no longer access it. –  Jiawei Li Jun 23 '11 at 12:57
    
@jiaweihli that's just how it works - think of C as the equivalent of a private method in Java or C++ and you'd have the same problem. –  Alnitak Jun 23 '11 at 12:58
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