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I am trying to figure out the pros and cons of using sessionid based authentication vs cookie based authentication

As far as I can see in cookie based authentication

  • User submits a login request sending their credentials
  • The credentials are checked against a database
  • Cookie will be set with the user details
  • This will be done over https and the cookies will be encrypted.
  • In .net if this is the authcookie user identity will be set
  • The db is hit just once and subsequent calls just check the auth cookie

In case of session based authentication

  • User submits a login request sending their credentials
  • The credentials are checked against a database
  • A session id is generated and is also stored in a db
  • Cookie will be set with the user details and a generated session id
  • Subsequent calls will compare the session id against the one in the database
  • The db is hit every time

Questions

Is there any reason to prefer one over the other? Is the cookie based less secure (even if you encrypt and sign them)? Is the performance of session based worse since it hits the database during each call? I have seen several sites leaning one way or the other but could not get a clear picture of what approach to use. Any discussions/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm having a hard time digesting this question. To my knowledge, forms-based authentication comes in two flavors: cookies and cookieless. Cookie-based authentication is preferred.

In the cookie-based version, the user gets a coookie whose value is an encrypted Forms Authentication Ticket. The cookie is encrypted at the server. Unless the encryption key is shared from machine.config or over-written in Web.config, the cookie can only be decrypted by the server that issued it. I believe the encryption is AES, which is very secure.

In the cookieless approach, the payload of the cookie is put in the url using an HTTPModule. This approach is only used when the device does not support cookies (rare). The cookieless approach is not preferred - it makes AJAX more difficult.

See:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1d3t3c61.aspx

and

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/910443

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Apologies for the delayed reply. I am currently auditing some code (Java) that actually creates a sessionkey when the user logs in stores it as a cookie and every time a protected service is called, gets the sessionkey and checks the database to see if the session is active. This seems to be a different design than asp forms auth where we dont hit the db everytime. The approach with session and checking the database seems to be inefficient. Am I right in thinking this way? –  user275157 Jul 6 '11 at 3:27
2  
My opinion: Hitting the db with a session check for each request is not a big deal. The session table itself will require careful indexing and optimization to avoid bottlenecks. –  Brett Jul 6 '11 at 15:10
    
Thanks. And just to be sure - am I right in thinking that the above method is not necessarily more secure than the forms auth approach? –  user275157 Jul 7 '11 at 13:25
2  
If the session key is encrypted on the server and sent as a cookie back to the client, then I don't see a problem. If the session key is not encrypted, I would have a problem with that. A user could start spoofing the key and attempt to impersonate another user. If SSL is being used, you're not worried so much about the cookie being stolen, but, rather, that the authenticated user could attempt to impersonate or steal another user's session. Bottom line: a user should not be able to read their authentication ticket / key. –  Brett Jul 7 '11 at 15:00
    
Thanks. Session key is encrypted on the server and SSL is being used. –  user275157 Jul 8 '11 at 9:51
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