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I have a class internal class BasePage : System.Web.UI.Page in my common web library. It appears that the actual ASPX (markup) portion of a page is compiled outside of the assembly in which the code is defined. This would mean that the class on both sides as well as the base class have to be public.

This is a "web application", not a "web site" project.

I have the assemblies setup as "friend assemblies" but the problem is that the ASPX is NOT compiled into the same assembly as the rest of the code in the Web Application. And therefore it can't access the internals of the assemblies.

The ASPX pages are generated to a random (?) assembly. My assembly's are all signed so I can't add the generated assembly, even if I knew what the name was, as a friend.

How can I enable a page to derive from an internal base class?

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Is this a Web Site (File->New Web Site) or a Web Application Project (File->New Project)? –  John Saunders Jun 23 '11 at 14:09
    
Sorry, it's a web application. (That's what I mean by the "web-applications" tag but I understand it was not clear.) –  Josh M. Jun 23 '11 at 15:00

1 Answer 1

Have you looked into friend assemblies? I haven't tried it specifically with what you are trying to do, but it may still work.

Is there a reason you don't want the base type to be public?

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Yes I have the assemblies setup as "friend assemblies" but the problem is that the ASPX is NOT compiled into the same assembly as the rest of the code in the Web Application. And therefore it can't access the internals of the assemblies. –  Josh M. Jun 23 '11 at 15:02
    
Being a friend assembly means it has access to the internals. If the resulting assembly name from the compiled ASPX pages is known ahead of time (if it is something predictable), then naming that assembly as a friend should, in theory, work. However, like I said in my response, I haven't done it myself, so there could be something else I'm unaware of that will prevent it from working. Personally I would mark the base type as public, is there a reason you don't want that? –  Brian Ball Jun 23 '11 at 23:53
    
The ASPX pages are generated to a random (?) assembly. My assembly's are all signed so I can't add the generated assembly, even if I knew what the name was, as a friend. (I should have mentioned the signing earlier.) –  Josh M. Jun 24 '11 at 3:07
    
Yes, the signing is important. I wasn't sure if the assembly names for the ASPXs were randomly generated or if the name it generates is predictable. You still haven't given an explanation for why the base class is internal. Is it really that important? –  Brian Ball Jun 24 '11 at 12:35
    
Well it's internal because it's not a public thing. Sure, it could be public, but what's the point of having access modifiers if I can't use them? I'd prefer to keep "things that nobody needs to or should see" marked as internal. I realize that it's not crucial that they be internal, but I'm curious as to how I could make it work AND get the ASPX to compile into the same assembly. (Pre-compiling?) –  Josh M. Jun 24 '11 at 13:09

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