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I have a little script to read in, parse and derive some kind of interesting (not really) statistics from an apache log file. So far I've made two simple options, the total number of bytes sent in all requests in the log file, and a top 10 of the most common IP adresses.

The first "mode" is just a simple sum of all the parsed bytes. The second one is a fold over a map (Data.Map), using insertWith (+) 1' to count the occurrences.

The first one runs as I expected, most of the time spent parsing, in constant space.

42,359,709,344 bytes allocated in the heap 72,405,840 bytes copied during GC 113,712 bytes maximum residency (1553 sample(s)) 145,872 bytes maximum slop 2 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

Generation 0: 76311 collections,
0 parallel, 0.89s, 0.99s elapsed
Generation 1: 1553 collections, 0 parallel, 0.21s, 0.22s elapsed

INIT time 0.00s ( 0.00s elapsed) MUT time 21.76s ( 24.82s elapsed) GC time 1.10s ( 1.20s elapsed) EXIT time
0.00s ( 0.00s elapsed) Total time 22.87s ( 26.02s elapsed)

%GC time 4.8% (4.6% elapsed)

Alloc rate 1,946,258,962 bytes per MUT second

Productivity 95.2% of total user, 83.6% of total elapsed

However, the second one does not!

49,398,834,152 bytes allocated in the heap 580,579,208 bytes copied during GC 718,385,088 bytes maximum residency (15 sample(s)) 134,532,128 bytes maximum slop 1393 MB total memory in use (172 MB lost due to fragmentation)

Generation 0: 91275 collections,
0 parallel, 252.65s, 254.46s elapsed
Generation 1: 15 collections, 0 parallel, 0.12s, 0.12s elapsed

INIT time 0.00s ( 0.00s elapsed) MUT time 41.11s ( 48.87s elapsed) GC time 252.77s (254.58s elapsed) EXIT time
0.00s ( 0.01s elapsed) Total time 293.88s (303.45s elapsed)

%GC time 86.0% (83.9% elapsed)

Alloc rate 1,201,635,385 bytes per MUT second

Productivity 14.0% of total user, 13.5% of total elapsed

And here is the code.

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}

module Main where

import qualified Data.Attoparsec.Lazy as AL
import Data.Attoparsec.Char8 hiding (space, take)
import qualified Data.ByteString.Char8 as S
import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8 as L
import Control.Monad (liftM)
import System.Environment (getArgs)
import Prelude hiding (takeWhile)
import qualified Data.Map as M
import Data.List (foldl', sortBy)
import Text.Printf (printf)
import Data.Maybe (fromMaybe)

type Command = String

data LogLine = LogLine {
    getIP     :: S.ByteString,
    getIdent  :: S.ByteString,
    getUser   :: S.ByteString,
    getDate   :: S.ByteString,
    getReq    :: S.ByteString,
    getStatus :: S.ByteString,
    getBytes  :: S.ByteString,
    getPath   :: S.ByteString,
    getUA     :: S.ByteString
} deriving (Ord, Show, Eq)

quote, lbrack, rbrack, space :: Parser Char
quote  = satisfy (== '\"')
lbrack = satisfy (== '[')
rbrack = satisfy (== ']')
space  = satisfy (== ' ')

quotedVal :: Parser S.ByteString
quotedVal = do
    quote
    res <- takeTill (== '\"')
    quote
    return res

bracketedVal :: Parser S.ByteString
bracketedVal = do
    lbrack
    res <- takeTill (== ']')
    rbrack
    return res

val :: Parser S.ByteString
val = takeTill (== ' ')

line :: Parser LogLine
l    ine = do
    ip <- val
    space
    identity <- val
    space
    user <- val
    space
    date <- bracketedVal
    space
    req <- quotedVal
    space
    status <- val
    space
    bytes <- val
    (path,ua) <- option ("","") combined
    return $ LogLine ip identity user date req status bytes path ua

combined :: Parser (S.ByteString,S.ByteString)
combined = do
    space
    path <- quotedVal
    space
    ua <- quotedVal
    return (path,ua)

countBytes :: [L.ByteString] -> Int
countBytes = foldl' count 0
    where
        count acc l = case AL.maybeResult $ AL.parse line l of
            Just x  -> (acc +) . maybe 0 fst . S.readInt . getBytes $ x
            Nothing -> acc

countIPs :: [L.ByteString] -> M.Map S.ByteString Int
countIPs = foldl' count M.empty
    where
        count acc l = case AL.maybeResult $ AL.parse line l of
            Just x -> M.insertWith' (+) (getIP x) 1 acc
            Nothing -> acc

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

main :: IO ()
main = do
  [cmd,path] <- getArgs
  dispatch cmd path

pretty :: Show a => Int -> (a, Int) -> String
pretty i (bs, n) = printf "%d: %s, %d" i (show bs) n

dispatch :: Command -> FilePath -> IO ()
dispatch cmd path = action path
    where
        action = fromMaybe err (lookup cmd actions)
        err    = printf "Error: %s is not a valid command." cmd

actions :: [(Command, FilePath -> IO ())]
actions = [("bytes", countTotalBytes)
          ,("ips",  topListIP)]

countTotalBytes :: FilePath -> IO ()
countTotalBytes path = print . countBytes . L.lines =<< L.readFile path

topListIP :: FilePath -> IO ()
topListIP path = do
    f <- liftM L.lines $ L.readFile path
    let mostPopular (_,a) (_,b) = compare b a
        m = countIPs f
    mapM_ putStrLn . zipWith pretty [1..] . take 10 . sortBy mostPopular . M.toList $ m

Edit:

Adding +RTS -A16M reduced GC to 20%. Memory use of course unchanged.

share|improve this question
1  
Not a solution, but foldl' over an accumulating map is a waste. Just use a regular foldl. –  John L Jun 23 '11 at 14:09
    
@John L, you're quite right, a quick test shows no difference in speed, GC or memory use, between foldl and foldl' in this case. –  Erik Kronberg Jun 23 '11 at 14:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suggest making the following changes to the code:

@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
+{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns, OverloadedStrings #-}

 module Main where

@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@
 import Control.Monad (liftM)
 import System.Environment (getArgs)
 import Prelude hiding (takeWhile)
-import qualified Data.Map as M
+import qualified Data.HashMap.Strict as M
 import Data.List (foldl', sortBy)
 import Text.Printf (printf)
 import Data.Maybe (fromMaybe)
@@ -17,15 +17,15 @@
 type Command = String

 data LogLine = LogLine {
-    getIP     :: S.ByteString,
-    getIdent  :: S.ByteString,
-    getUser   :: S.ByteString,
-    getDate   :: S.ByteString,
-    getReq    :: S.ByteString,
-    getStatus :: S.ByteString,
-    getBytes  :: S.ByteString,
-    getPath   :: S.ByteString,
-    getUA     :: S.ByteString
+    getIP     :: !S.ByteString,
+    getIdent  :: !S.ByteString,
+    getUser   :: !S.ByteString,
+    getDate   :: !S.ByteString,
+    getReq    :: !S.ByteString,
+    getStatus :: !S.ByteString,
+    getBytes  :: !S.ByteString,
+    getPath   :: !S.ByteString,
+    getUA     :: !S.ByteString
 } deriving (Ord, Show, Eq)

 quote, lbrack, rbrack, space :: Parser Char
@@ -39,14 +39,14 @@
     quote
     res <- takeTill (== '\"')
     quote
-    return res
+    return $! res

 bracketedVal :: Parser S.ByteString
 bracketedVal = do
     lbrack
     res <- takeTill (== ']')
     rbrack
-    return res
+    return $! res

 val :: Parser S.ByteString
 val = takeTill (== ' ')
@@ -67,14 +67,14 @@
     space
     bytes <- val
     (path,ua) <- option ("","") combined
-    return $ LogLine ip identity user date req status bytes path ua
+    return $! LogLine ip identity user date req status bytes path ua

 combined :: Parser (S.ByteString,S.ByteString)
 combined = do
     space
-    path <- quotedVal
+    !path <- quotedVal
     space
-    ua <- quotedVal
+    !ua <- quotedVal
     return (path,ua)

 countBytes :: [L.ByteString] -> Int
@@ -84,11 +84,11 @@
             Just x  -> (acc +) . maybe 0 fst . S.readInt . getBytes $ x
             Nothing -> acc

-countIPs :: [L.ByteString] -> M.Map S.ByteString Int
+countIPs :: [L.ByteString] -> M.HashMap S.ByteString Int
 countIPs = foldl' count M.empty
     where
         count acc l = case AL.maybeResult $ AL.parse line l of
-            Just x -> M.insertWith' (+) (getIP x) 1 acc
+            Just x -> M.insertWith (+) (getIP x) 1 acc
             Nothing -> acc

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I made the fields of LogLine strict to avoid them containing thunks referring to expressions related to parsing. It's good practice to make fields strict, unless you really need them to be lazy.

I made sure that the parse result is created as soon as possible (that's the $! part of the change), also to avoid delaying the parsing until you actually inspect the individual fields of LogLine.

Finally I switched to a better data structure, HashMap from the unordered-containers package. Note that all functions in Data.HashMap.Strict are value strict, which means we can use the plain insertWith variant.

Note that taking a sub-string of a ByteString forces the original string to be retained in memory, due to sharing the underlying storage (this is the same as for Java's String). If you want to make sure that no extra memory is retained, use the copy function from the bytestring package. You can try to call copy on the result of (getIP x) and see if that makes any difference. The trade-off here is using some extra computation to copy the string in return for lower space usage.

Note that using -A<high number> tend to improve performance of short running programs (i.e. benchmarks) but not necessarily on real programs. Same goes for -H. At least a higher -H value (e.g. 1G) doesn't hurt the performance of your program.

share|improve this answer
    
Using (just) copy and -A16M the script is now at 85% productivity and peaks at 300MB mem use (compared to the previous 1.3GB). Slowed down from 40 sec to 50 sec parsing this 5 million line file I tested it on though. Gonna test out your other suggestions too! –  Erik Kronberg Jun 23 '11 at 22:19
    
I would recommend trying -H (with 512M-1G or so) and lower the -A to match your L2 cache size. –  tibbe Jun 24 '11 at 6:30
    
-A2M -H1G gives me ~53s (having a 2MB L2 cache). Oddly though, -A16M gives me 40 seconds and -A50M 36 seconds. Also I did get a performance boost from switching to the strict HashMap, and another boost when I switched again to Gregory Collin's hashtables. –  Erik Kronberg Jun 24 '11 at 10:41
    
If you increase -A enough the GC will never run, as the nursery will never be completely full before the program terminates. In long running programs a high -A value is often bad, but in benchmarks it will sometimes improve things dramatically. –  tibbe Jun 27 '11 at 17:06

The most obvious point is that your first script can throw away data as soon as it's seen it, whereas the second one must hold on to everything it's seen. Hence, you'd expect the second script to take at least O(N) memory whereas the first can run in constant space.

Have you tried running with heap profiling turned on? I could make some stabs at where the excess allocations are likely to be happening in your code, but there's no substitute for hard data.

I'd be eying the Data.Map.insertWith' calls with suspicion myself, since each one renders a chunk of the extant Map surplus to requirements and requires copying and rebalancing but that's pure guesswork on my part. If the insertWith' calls are to blame, then since you don't need interstitial Map entries, it might be faster to build the entire map in one pass (without any increments to count IPs) and then do a second pass to do the counts. That way you won't waste time rebalancing the Map. You could also take advantage of the fact that your key datatype fits into an Int (well, it does if it's an IPv4 address at least) and use a Data.IntMap instead, which has much lower memory overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly! It parses the line and only keeps a small part, the IP adress. The original file parsed is almost 1.3GB in size, so most of it gets locked in memory anyway! But I agree, insertWith is the most likely perp. –  Erik Kronberg Jun 23 '11 at 13:28
    
This post from the Haskell beginners list web.archiveorange.com/archive/v/aHum2LrqyulnPSegisUW answers a similar question. Sadly I don't think the solution proposed there will help your problem, since your requirements are different! –  Phil Armstrong Jun 23 '11 at 13:34
    
I do make the same mistake though, quote: fold and insert on a map is a "Bad Idea"! Will try increasing allocation area. –  Erik Kronberg Jun 23 '11 at 13:49
    
That's true. My guess is that Data.Map is just the wrong datatype for this application: it's too general & offers a set of guarantees that you're paying for but don't actually need. There's a Judy array library on hackage, which will probably give much better performance, at the cost of moving more of your code into the IO Monad! –  Phil Armstrong Jun 23 '11 at 14:00
    
I read the link above, but can't figure out why fold and insert on a map is a bad idea. Can someone provide a link spelling it out for slow people like me? Or should I ask a question? Thanks! –  Tim Perry Jun 23 '11 at 18:21

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