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Sorry in advance, but I'm new to Python. I have a list of tuples, and I was wondering how I can reference, say, the first element of each tuple within the list. I would think it's something like

for i in number_of_tuples :
  first_element = myList[i[0]]

you know, [list_element[tuple_element]]? However, this doesn't appear to be the right approach. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Turner

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myList[i][0] or more fun: [i[0] for i in myList] –  phkahler Jun 23 '11 at 13:47
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5 Answers 5

You can get a list of the first element in each tuple using a list comprehension:

>>> my_tuples = [(1, 2, 3), ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'), (True, False), 'qwerty']
>>> first_elts = [x[0] for x in my_tuples]
>>> first_elts
[1, 'a', True, 'q']
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All of the other answers here are correct but do not explain why what you were trying was wrong. When you do myList[i[0]] you are telling python that i is a tuple and you want the value or the first element of tuple i as the postions for myList.

In the majority of programming languages when you need to access a nested data type, such as arrays, lists, or tuples. You append the brackets to get to the innermost item. The first bracket gives you the location of the tuple in your list. The second bracket gives you the location of the item in the tuple.

This is a quick rudimentary example that I came up with.

info = [ ( 1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6) ]

info[0][0] == 1
info[0][1] == 2
info[1][0] == 3
info[1][1] == 4
info[2][0] == 5
info[2][1] == 6

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This is the best answer on the page. –  dotancohen Jan 27 '13 at 7:46
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The code

my_list = [(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6)]
for t in my_list:
    print t

prints

(1, 2)
(3, 4)
(5, 6)

The loop iterates over my_list, and assigns the elements of my_list to t one after the other. The elements of my_list happen to be tuples, so t will always be a tuple. To access the first element of the tuple t, use t[0]:

for t in my_list:
    print t[0]

To access the first element of the tuple at the given index i in the list, you can use

print my_list[i][0]
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Rather than:

first_element = myList[i[0]]

You probably want:

first_element = myList[i][0]
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You also can use itemgetter operator:

from operator import itemgetter
data = [('c','r'), (2, 3), ('e'), (True, False),('text','sample')]
map(itemgetter(0), my_tuples)
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