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I often come across code like the following:

if ( items != null)
{
   foreach(T item in items)
   {
        //...
   }
}

Basically, the if condition ensures that foreach block will execute only if items is not null. I'm wondering if the if condition is really needed, or foreach will handle the case if items == null.

I mean, can I simply write

foreach(T item in items)
{
    //...
}

without worrying about whether items is null or not? Is the if condition superfluous? Or this depends on the type of items or maybe on T as well?

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6  
Did you try it? –  Mark Peters Jun 23 '11 at 14:10
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10 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You still need to check if (items != null) otherwise you will get NullReferenceException. However you can do something like this:

List<string> items = null;  
foreach (var item in items ?? new List<string>())
{
    item.Dump();
}

but you might check performance of it. So I still prefer having if (items != null) first.

Based on Eric's Lippert suggestion I changed code to:

List<string> items = null;  
foreach (var item in items ?? Enumerable.Empty<string>())
{
    item.Dump();
}
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7  
Cute idea; an empty array would be preferable because it consumes less memory and produces less memory pressure. Enumerable.Empty<string> would be even more preferable because it caches the empty array it generates and re-uses it. –  Eric Lippert Jun 23 '11 at 14:23
6  
Did @Eric Lippert just use the word "cute"? –  BoltClock Jun 23 '11 at 14:31
3  
@CodeInChaos: Do you typically find that the speed of enumerating an empty sequence is the performance bottleneck in your program? –  Eric Lippert Jun 23 '11 at 15:19
2  
It doesn't only reduce the enumeration speed of the empty sequence, but of the full sequence as well. And if the sequence is long enough it can matter. For most code we should choose the idiomatic code. But the two allocations you mentioned will be a performance problem in even fewer cases. –  CodesInChaos Jun 23 '11 at 15:22
4  
@CodeInChaos: Ah, I see your point now. When the compiler can detect that the "foreach" is iterating over a List<T> or an array then it can optimize the foreach to use value-type enumerators or actually generate a "for" loop. When forced to enumerate over either a list or the empty sequence it has to go back to the "lowest common denominator" codegen, which can in some cases be slower and produce more memory pressure. This is a subtle but excellent point. Of course, the moral of the story is - as always - if you have a perf problem then profile it to find out what the real bottleneck is. –  Eric Lippert Jun 23 '11 at 16:39
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The real takeaway here should be a sequence should almost never be null in the first place. Simply make it an invariant in all of your programs that if you have a sequence, it is never null. It is always initialized to be the empty sequence or some other genuine sequence.

If a sequence is never null then obviously you don't need to check it.

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How about if you get the sequence from a WCF service? It might be null, right? –  Nawaz Jun 23 '11 at 14:57
2  
@Nawaz: If I had a WCF service that returned me null sequences intending them to be empty sequences then I would report that to them as a bug. That said: if you have to deal with badly formed output of arguably buggy services, then yes, you have to deal with it by checking for null. –  Eric Lippert Jun 23 '11 at 15:20
2  
Unless, of course, null and empty mean completely different things. Sometimes that's valid for sequences. –  configurator Jun 23 '11 at 23:32
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Actually there is a feature request on that @Connect: http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/93497/foreach-should-check-for-null

And the response is quite logical:

I think that most foreach loops are written with the intent of iterating a non-null collection. If you try iterating through null you should get your exception, so that you can fix your code.

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+1. This is good. foreach must check for null. –  Nawaz Jun 23 '11 at 14:08
    
I guess there are pros and cons for this, so they decided to keep it as it was designed in the first place. after all, the foreach is just some syntactic sugar. if you'd have called items.GetEnumerator() that would have crashed also if items was null, so you had to test that first. –  Marius Bancila Jun 23 '11 at 14:10
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You could always test it out with a null list... but this is what I found on the msdn website

foreach-statement:
    foreach   (   type   identifier   in   expression   )   embedded-statement 

If expression has the value null, a System.NullReferenceException is thrown.

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It is not superflous. At runtime items will be casted to an IEnumerable and its GetEnumerator method will be called. That will cause a dereferencing of items that will fail

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1) The sequence will not necessarily be cast to IEnumerable and 2) It's a design decision to make it throw. C# could easily insert that null check if the developers considered that a good idea. –  CodesInChaos Jun 23 '11 at 14:35
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You can encapsulate the null check in an extension method and use a lambda:

public static class EnumerableExtensions {
  public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> self, Action<T> action) {
    if (self != null) {
      foreach (var element in self) {
        action(element);
      }
    }
  }
}

The code becomes:

items.ForEach(item => { 
  ...
});

If can be even more concise if you want to just call a method that takes an item and returns void:

items.ForEach(MethodThatTakesAnItem);
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You do need this. You'll get an exception when foreach accesses the container to set up the iteration otherwise.

Under the covers, foreach uses an interface implemented on the collection class to perform the iteration. The generic equivalent interface is here.

The foreach statement of the C# language (for each in Visual Basic) hides the complexity of the enumerators. Therefore, using foreach is recommended instead of directly manipulating the enumerator.

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Just as a note it technically doesn't use the interface, it uses duck typing: blogs.msdn.com/b/kcwalina/archive/2007/07/18/ducknotation.aspx the interfaces ensure that the right methods and properties are there though, and aid understanding of intent. as well as use outside foreach... –  ShuggyCoUk Jun 23 '11 at 14:57
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The test is necessary, because if the collection is null, foreach will throw a NullReferenceException. It's actually quite simple to try it out.

List<string> items = null;
foreach(var item in items)
{
   Console.WriteLine(item);
}
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the second will throw a NullReferenceException with the message Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

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As mentioned here you need to check is it not null.

Do not use an expression that evaluates to null.

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