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I need to clear this warning :

 try
 {
     doSomething()
 }
 catch (AmbiguousMatchException MyException)
 {
     doSomethingElse()
 }

The complier is telling me : The variable 'MyException' is declared but never used

How can I fix this.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 62 down vote accepted

1- You can remove it like this:

try
 {
     doSomething()
 }
 catch (AmbiguousMatchException)
 {
     doSomethingElse()
 }

2- Use warning disable like this:

try
 {
     doSomething()
 }
 #pragma warning disable 0168
 catch (AmbiguousMatchException exception)
 #pragma warning restore 0168
 {
     doSomethingElse()
 }

Other familiar warning disable

#pragma warning disable 0168 // variable declared but not used.
#pragma warning disable 0219 // variable assigned but not used.
#pragma warning disable 0414 // private field assigned but not used.
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2  
A list of all compiler errors and warnings are available at the MSDN –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jun 23 '11 at 16:38
    
The solution given by @fparadis2 is better since not advisable to supress warnings when we can fix it –  DRAM May 17 '13 at 12:34
    
@dasariramacharanprasad that was my first suggestion, re-read my answer ;) –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd May 20 '13 at 11:21
1  
+1 @Jalal for alternate options. yes you are right! –  DRAM May 22 '13 at 7:06
    
using System.Reflection; is the namespace. This question & answer was very helpful. –  Catto Jun 10 '13 at 15:05

You declare a name for the exception, MyException, but you never do anything with it. Since it's not used, the compiler points it out.

You can simply remove the name.

catch(AmbiguousMatchException)
{
   doSomethingElse();
}
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You can simply write:

catch (AmbiguousMatchException)

and omit the exception name if you won't be using it in the catch clause.

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+1 since it resolves the warning! not explained in MSDN. –  DRAM May 17 '13 at 12:33
    
using System.Reflection; is the namespace. This question & answer was very helpful. –  Catto Jun 10 '13 at 15:06

The trouble is, you aren't using your variable MyException anywhere. It gets declared, but isn't used. This isn't a problem... just the compiler giving you a hint in case you intended to use it.

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You could write the exception out to a log if you've got one running. Might be useful for tracking down any problems.

Log.Write("AmbiguousMatchException: {0}", MyException.Message);
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