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I am in the need of a Set implementation that will let me maintain insertion order and still be concuurently modifiable (as in not throw ConcurrentModificationException).

I tried using ConcurrentSkipListSet with my own comparator - sample code:

public static void main(String[] str){
        ConcurrentSkipListSet set  = new ConcurrentSkipListSet(new Comparator() {

            public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {
                if(o1.equals(o2)){
                    return 0;
                }
                return -1;
            }
        });
        set.add("d");
        set.add("b");
        set.add("a");
        try {
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        set.add("c");
        set.add("b");

        System.out.println(set);
        set.remove("b");
        System.out.println(set);
    }

But it appears this comparator is a #fail because the set prints:
[b, c, a, b, d] . Its no set if b's in there twice.
Are there any other alternatives I should look at?

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The answer to this is what the guy asking stackoverflow.com/questions/5290790/… is after. –  Tnem Jun 23 '11 at 14:44

3 Answers 3

You've defined a comparator that does not abide the total order property. For two objects, either should one be smaller than the other, or the other smaller than the first.

In your case, if the objects are not equal, then each is smaller than the other.

Since you're instantiating a ConcurrentSkipListSet without any type parameters saying what the type of the elements in the collection will be, you'll have troubles defining the comparator unless you use casting. But if you create a new ConcurrentSkipListSet<String>, it will be easier to define the comparator, as you will know that your objects are strings.

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I am trying to retrofit the property of natural ordering (i.e. ascending order in case of a String) to order of insertion. So perhaps the question arises if such a retrofit is possible? –  Varun Garde Jun 23 '11 at 15:28
1  
There are other concurrent data structures to use if you'd like to retain the insertion order - concurrent queues, for instance. With concurrent skip lists, it is possibly possible if you keep a global counter which you increase with a CAS and write its value into the element just before you insert the element into the list. The problem then is that you lose the linearizability property - someone might insert another object into the list in the time between "stamping" the object and inserting. I'd say that without modifying the internals of conc-skip-lists, it's very hard or impossible. –  axel22 Jun 23 '11 at 15:41
    
As described in the comment above, you could track, say, the creation order, but not necessarily the insertion order. Perhaps the first is what you need... –  axel22 Jun 23 '11 at 15:42

You can define a comparator which will keep the insertion order of the strings and use that, it won't be pretty but since the comparator is always called for each new element all you need to do is something like this:

public void testInsertionOrderSkipListSet() {
  Comparator<String> insertionOrderComparator = new Comparator<String>() {

    private final ConcurrentHashMap<String, Integer> order = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, Integer>();
    @Override
    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
      if (!order.contains(o2)) //only happens on second insert
        order.put(o2, 0);
      if (order.containsKey(o1))
        return order.get(o1).compareTo(order.get(o2));
      order.put(o1, order.size());
      return 1;
    }
  };
  ConcurrentSkipListSet<String> set = new ConcurrentSkipListSet<String>(insertionOrderComparator);

  set.add("a");
  set.add("c");
  set.add("e");
  set.add("b");
  set.add("d");
  set.add("c");
  assertArrayEquals(new String[] { "a", "c", "e", "b", "d"}, set.toArray(new String[]{}));
}

Hey, I said it wasn't pretty...

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You're right, if its a retro-fit, its a retro-fit. I modified (and posted here) this solution to be consistent for removes as well. –  Varun Garde Jun 24 '11 at 7:48

I pretty much used @Asaf's solution, however I refined it a bit to hold true with remove operations as well:

class ConcurrentInsertionOrderSet extends ConcurrentSkipListSet{
        Map<Object, Integer> orderMap;
        final AtomicInteger increment = new AtomicInteger();
        public ConcurrentInsertionOrderSet(final Map<Object, Integer> orderMap) {
            super(new Comparator<Object>() {      
                public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {
                    return (orderMap.get(o1).compareTo(orderMap.get(o2)));
                }
            });
            this.orderMap = orderMap;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean add(Object o) {
            if (!orderMap.containsKey(o)) 
                orderMap.put(o, increment.incrementAndGet());
            return super.add(o);
        }
        @Override
        public boolean remove(Object o) {
            boolean b = super.remove(o);
            if(b)
                orderMap.remove(o);
            return b;
        }
    }

And for Test:

public static void main(String[] str){
        ConcurrentSkipListSet set  = new ConcurrentInsertionOrderSet(new ConcurrentHashMap());
        set.add("d");
        set.add("b");
        set.add("a");
        set.add("c");
        set.add("b");
        set.add("c");
        set.add("g");
        System.out.println(set);
        set.remove("b");
        System.out.println(set);
        set.remove("c");
        set.add("c");
        System.out.println(set);
    }

Output is a nice and consistent:
[d, b, a, c, g]
[d, a, c, g]
[d, a, g, c]

But I guess @axel22 's concern about race condition still holds.

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