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I am using a C library which has callback functions such as:

int DownloadStream(LPCTSTR  host,DWORD channelNumber,NewImage pNewImage);
typedef int  (*NewImage)(BYTE *pData, int nLen,void *returnHandle);

In C i can make call like this:

int  CallDownloadStream(LPCTSTR  host,DWORD channelNumber)
{

  int hr = DownloadStream(host,channelNumber,OnNewImage);

  return hr;

}


int OnNewImage(BYTE *pData, int nLen,void *returnHandle)
{

   // able to get data

}

What i want is call those function as a member of C++ class such as:

class MyClass
{

public:


   int  CallDownloadStream(LPCTSTR  host,DWORD channelNumber)
   {

       int hr = DownloadStream(host,channelNumber,OnNewImag);

       return hr;
   }

   int OnNewImage(BYTE *pData, int nLen,void *returnHandle)
   {

   // able to get data

   }
}

I can not able to compile it. Is it possible to use those callback function in that way? If so how can do this?

PS: I have no control over original C style callback functions.

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1  
What is void *returnHandle ? Is there another function which allow to you set its value to whatever you want ? It could be used to pass an instance to your class, and get it back when the callback is called. –  Jem Jun 23 '11 at 15:27
    
It is a feature for aspecific API function...Does not releate with class instance. –  Novalis Jun 23 '11 at 15:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Cannot be done. If the C function does not provide for a user-supplied argument pointer, which is idiomatic in C, then you cannot do this.

Edit: This isn't strictly true. You can use a static variable, you can use thread-local storage, or you can JIT a function. However, those are not general-case solutions.

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What is user-supplied argument pointer? Actually some API has some args like "void *pUser" which says "A Variable to transmit Callback Function". Can it be user-supplied argument pointer? –  Novalis Jun 23 '11 at 15:23
    
@6.45.Vapuru: A user-supplied argument pointer is where you pass the API a pointer which it then passes your callback without modification - effectively allowing you to pass "this" in. However the signature of the functions suggests that they do not do this. –  Puppy Jun 23 '11 at 15:26
    
I see.. Thanks. –  Novalis Jun 23 '11 at 15:37
    
is right. One nasty hack that may work - depending on your exact usage - is to store the this pointer in some globally accessible variable - possibly in a map keyed on the other state data. That breaks down if you might have multiple instances registered and there is no one-to-one correspondence with the other state, but it's about the best you can do in this case. –  philsquared Jun 23 '11 at 15:41

What you're doing is passing a function pointer so that a C function can call it. In other words, the function pointer you pass has to be callable from C. This means that it needs to be extern "C", and cannot be a typical member function. It could be a static member function, or a free-standing function, but not a class member function.

This means that the callback function can't affect class data members. It can affect static member data, or global data, or whatever else, but not class member data. If this is the effect you were looking for, you need to provide some sort of non-class buffer and shift the data yourself.

It also means that the function passed can't be polymorphic. If you want polymorphic behavior, you need to have all the callback functions you want to pass defined as static or outside any class, and have the call to the library function in a polymorphic function.

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You cannot use non-static member functions as C callback functions.

So the answer is to use a static member function.

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typically a public member friend void __stdcall CallBack(Data* pData) which uses a 'self' pointer inside the passed in data structure to call the class –  Martin Beckett Jun 23 '11 at 15:23
    
He doesn't provide the pData argument, the library does. –  Puppy Jun 23 '11 at 15:24
    
-1: A static method does not have a this pointer even if that were the usage of that param in the callback. –  AJG85 Jun 23 '11 at 15:26
    
Yes. pData provided by library –  Novalis Jun 23 '11 at 15:26
    
Using a static member function probably works OK with Visual C++ (I haven't checked with latest versions), but for some other compilers and in the formal the static member function can't be used directly as callback, because the callback, in the formal, needs to be extern "C". And you can't apply that to a static member function. Happily this question has been discussed many times on Usenet, and as I recall there is no compiler that doesn't at least provide you some way to tell it to shut up and Just Do It. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 23 '11 at 15:27

You might be able to use libsigc++ - http://libsigc.sourceforge.net/ (look at the documentation for mem_fun). I don't know exactly what would be required in order for it to work properly. Alternatively, make a C call back function which simply calls the proper C++ function using a pointer to the object. (this is probably the easiest way to do this)

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Well, I do not want to hack. C/C++ is complex enough...No need more complexity:-) –  Novalis Jun 23 '11 at 15:50

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