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I have multiple threads which add items to a lock-free queue.
The items are then processed by another thread.

In the producer threads, I need to kick off the consumer thread, but only if it's not already running or kicked off.

Specifically:

public void BeginInvoke(Action method)
{
    //This runs on multiple background threads
    pendingActions.Enqueue(method);
    if (ProcessQueue hasn't been posted)
        uiContext.Post(ProcessQueue, null);
}
private void ProcessQueue(object unused)
{
    //This runs on the UI thread.
    Action current;
    while (pendingActions.TryDequeue(out current))
        current();
}

I'm using .Net 3.5, not 4.0. :(

share|improve this question
    
(I'm doing this because 100K calls to SynchronizationContext.Post end up killing the Windows message queue) –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 15:25
2  
I'm curious why does the producer have the responsibility of starting the consumer? –  Conrad Frix Jun 23 '11 at 15:28
    
@Conrad: The consumer is run on the UI thread, but only when there are items for it to process. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 15:29
    
If that's the case, then the question & title are worded somewhat confusingly. They make it sound like the consumer is running on a dedicated thread. –  Sean U Jun 23 '11 at 21:29
    
@Sean: I need exactly one thread to start the consumer – to call uiContext.Post(ProcessQueue, null); –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 21:42
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

The easiest way is to use Semaphore. It will have a count of queue size.

share|improve this answer
    
No; I don't want to block at all. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 15:35
    
@SLaks♦ even if there is no work to do for consumer thread? –  Andrey Jun 23 '11 at 15:35
    
If the consumer has nothing to do, it should exit. It's running on the UI thread. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 15:42
    
@SLaks♦ No problem! Basically Semaphore is that thread safe counter. You can use WaitOne(0) in order not to block it and check return value. –  Andrey Jun 23 '11 at 15:44
1  
@SLaks♦ Your should be faster, definetely. But question is how much faster. –  Andrey Jun 23 '11 at 16:12
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I created the following class to do this:

///<summary>Ensures that a block of code is only executed once at a time.</summary>
class Valve
{
    int isEntered;  //0 means false; 1 true

    ///<summary>Tries to enter the valve.</summary>
    ///<returns>True if no other thread is in the valve; false if the valve has already been entered.</returns>
    public bool TryEnter()
    {
        if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref isEntered, 1, 0) == 0)
            return true;
        return false;
    }

    ///<summary>Allows the valve to be entered again.</summary>
    public void Exit()
    {
        Debug.Assert(isEntered == 1);
        isEntered = 0;
    }
}

I use it like this:

readonly Valve valve = new Valve();
public void BeginInvoke(Action method)
{
    pendingActions.Enqueue(method);
    if (valve.TryEnter())
        uiContext.Post(ProcessQueue, null);
}
private void ProcessQueue(object unused)
{
    //This runs on the UI thread.
    Action current;
    while (pendingActions.TryDequeue(out current))
        current();
    valve.Exit();
}

Is this pattern safe?
Is there a better way to do this?
Is there a more correct name for the class?

share|improve this answer
    
@SLaks it know that you're purposely avoiding using Monitor.TryEnter. Are you sure its worth it? –  Conrad Frix Jun 23 '11 at 15:37
    
@Conrad: I'm releasing the lock from a different thread. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 15:42
    
I just realized that I was misunderstanding the return value of CompareExchange. I don't need the unique tokens. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 15:47
    
@SLaks So if I understand correctly, if multiple threads attempt to call BeginInvoke, one will succeed at calling uiContext.Post and the rest will be ignored. –  Conrad Frix Jun 23 '11 at 16:11
    
@Conrad: Exactly. ProcessQueue will then dequeue all of the items. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 16:26
show 7 more comments

Does this work for you?

volatile int running;  //not a boolean to allow ProcessQueue to be reentrant.

private void ProcessQueue(object unused)
{
    do
    {
        ++running;
        Action current;
        while (pendingActions.TryDequeue(out current))
            current();

        --running;
    }
    while (pendingActions.Count != 0);
} 

public void BeginInvoke(Action method) 
{     
    pendingActions.Enqueue(method);
    if (running != 0)
        uiContext.Post(ProcessQueue, null); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
No, because SynchronizationContext.Post is asynchronous, so this might call Post twice in a row before ProcessQueue runs. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 16:34
    
The point is that if you are queuing up a 100k posts then it is safe to assume the consummr thread is far slow then the producer threads. So most the time is spent in the consumption mode. So if I disable posting while consuming, I'll will cut down by orders of magnitudes, the number of extraneous posts. –  jyoung Jun 23 '11 at 19:51
    
Yes; that's exactly what I'm trying to do. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 20:00
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Create a second Dispatcher for the consumer thread. Then, producer threads can use that dispatcher's BeginInvoke() method to send data to the consumer thread. The Dispatcher's queue takes the place of your pendingActions queue, and ensures that the consumer thread is only processing one work item at a time.

Rather than having the producer threads try to coordinate starting and stopping the consumer thread, just start the consumer thread before any producers have been started, and let it sit idle. The Dispatcher should automatically take care of waking it up when needed.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the pattern that I'm replacing (except WinForms rather than WPF). I had so many rapid-fire messages that the event queue got full. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 15:59
    
Aha, gotcha. I just dealt with a similar situation by upgrading to .NET 4. :( So the next thing I'm wondering is, if you're running into that situation then perhaps a little blocking is actually your friend? After all, if they naturally tend to produce data faster than the consumer can consume it, then without any choking mechanism the size of the consumer's input queue will tend toward infinity. –  Sean U Jun 23 '11 at 16:17
    
My queue ought to be more scalable than Windows message queue; I'll find out when I run it. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 16:26
    
Dispatcher uses its own queue implementation instead of the Windows message queue, and though I haven't run a direct comparison I do get the impression that it seems to behave better. It might be worth giving it a shot before sinking time into a custom solution. –  Sean U Jun 23 '11 at 21:33
    
Yes, but I'm using WinForms. –  SLaks Jun 23 '11 at 21:41
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