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I have a template class from an API that is instantiated with something like this.

BitField< length > object;

The problem is that length variable is only known at runtime.

error: 'length' cannot appear in a constant-expression -> this is the error message

Any suggestions ?

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3  
Is it known to be no larger than 42? Then use BitField<42>. –  Bo Persson Jun 23 '11 at 15:43
    
@Bo: That is a sensible suggestion. Perhaps you should post it as an answer? –  John Bartholomew Jun 23 '11 at 16:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Templates are strictly a compile-time concept. After compilation, they're baked in and cannot be changed. You cannot use information only known at runtime as a template parameter.

One way around this is if you known an upper-bound for the size of your bitset, and use that constant for your templated bitset structure. If the upper-bound is unacceptably large, you'll have to use a different data structure, something akin to vector which is dynamically sized.

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You have to use another bitfield data structure that allows setting length at runtime.

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It depends on the degree of runtime flexibility you need. If you are dealing with a small set of scenarios, you could define constants for your possibilities and conditionally instantiate.

EDIT: Thanks John, no actual justification for #define over static const. I'm embarrassed that my C is showing. Maybe people will believe it was a keyboard malfunction.

...
static const int  8BIT = 8;
static const int 16BIT = 16;
static const int 32BIT = 32;
...
if( someDynamicCriteria == 8BIT )
{
    ...
    BitField<8BIT> object;
    ...
}
else if( someDynamicCriteria == 16BIT )
{
    ...
    BitField<16BIT> object;
    ...
}
else if( someDynamicCriteria == 32BIT )
{
    ...
    BitField<32BIT> object;
    ...
}
else
{
    // Unexpected case, error and exception handling
}

Obviously, this gets unwieldly quick. This is a very procedural approach, and if your logic needs to be truly dynamic, this kind of rigging quickly loses its worth.

EDIT: Let me be explicitly obvious. This is an approach if you are truly locked into this specific API and data structure, and the set of cases you need to handle are small. In other words, if "use something else" (which is, honestly, a better answer) simply will not work.

I also agree with others that defining an upper bound to your BitField which will work for all expected cases is a better idea, if the wasted space is not a big deal.

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Downvoting- macros should not be used in this case unless you're truly insane. –  Puppy Jun 23 '11 at 15:43
    
In a fairly limited context this can be quite a sensible approach, but @DeadMG is right -- the macros are totally pointless here, they add nothing except pollution. –  John Bartholomew Jun 23 '11 at 15:49
    
Fair enough, but for my own edification could you suggest a correct method in addition to pointing out this incorrect one? For instance, would creating a wrapper class to accept a dynamic size and "switching" on the passed size to use BitField be a better alternative, despite the additional complexity? –  dolphy Jun 23 '11 at 16:02
    
For my part, I haven't said this method is incorrect -- only that your use of #defines is odd, and should be avoided unless there's a good reason for using them, which I don't see here. If you really want to use named constants you can still use static const int values, which have the advantage of working within the normal C++ identifier scoping rules. Didn't downvote since it's a fairly trivial and somewhat irrelevant point. –  John Bartholomew Jun 23 '11 at 17:13
    
For the larger question, I would say that where applicable, Bo Persson's suggestion (use a BitField that supports your maximum size) is probably a better trade-off than having duplicated code paths. –  John Bartholomew Jun 23 '11 at 17:14

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