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I am very confused why the destrctor is called twice when excpetion is thrown and which point they are called??

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std;
class base
{
 public:
     base(){cout<<"constructor called"<<endl;}
     ~base(){cout<<"destructor called"<<endl;}
};
void fun()
{
     throw base(); //<=- Create temp obj of base, and throw exception

}
int main()
{
    try
    {
        fun();
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        cout<<"handle all exception"<<endl;
    }

}

following is the output

constructor called
destrctor called
handle all exception
destuctor is called

But when i added the copy constructor, it never called but destructor called only once so what's happening????

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std;
class base
{
 public:
     base(){cout<<"constructor called"<<endl;}
     ~base(){cout<<"destructor called"<<endl;}
     base (base &obj){cout<<"copy constructor called"<<endl;}
};
void fun()
{
     throw base(); //<=- Create temp obj of base, and throw exception
}
int main()
{
    try
    {
        fun();
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        cout<<"handle all exception"<<endl;
    }

}

output:

constructor called
handle all exception
destrctor called
share|improve this question
1  
I'd try putting a breakpoint in the destructor and check the stack trace both times, see who's calling it. –  filipe Jun 23 '11 at 15:28
2  
Only thrown once for me with this code. –  JackOfAllTrades Jun 23 '11 at 15:28
    
Add a copy constructor with a cout in it. You should see it being copied. –  Fred Larson Jun 23 '11 at 15:34
    
ideone.com/b8bHo destrctor called only once in this. –  Shashi Bhushan Jun 23 '11 at 15:38
    
Called twice in vs2010, even when capturing by reference. –  DanDan Jun 23 '11 at 15:39

3 Answers 3

Because exception object is copied in catch. Use catch (base&v) to grab by reference, not value.

share|improve this answer
    
but i am not catching by refernce , you are saying the behavior of catch(...) and catch(base&v) are same?? –  Alok Jun 23 '11 at 15:37
    
This is quite a strong statement. As far as I know, the exception is not being copied in the catch. The answer would be appropriate if the catch was originally catch ( base b ). On the other hand, the exception can be copied in the throw: create a local base object, copy it to the internal place where the exception is kept alive... until it is caught... but it is still an implementation detail: the implementation can make copies as required (@DeadMG answer is correct) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 23 '11 at 16:59
    
@David, I think catch(...) handler doesn't make a copy of object other wise (please see my code above) copy constructor of base class would have been called. –  Alok Jun 23 '11 at 19:59
    
@Alok: I know, of all things, the catch (...) would be the least probable to make a copy, it does not catch by reference, it just does not catch anything but the fact that an exception was thrown. That is the point, that the implementation can do as it pleases, and that includes doing different things depending on the presence or absence of non-trivial copy constructors, etc. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 23 '11 at 21:19
    
The compiler may make a copy, or as many copies as it likes. You must have a copy constructor available (i.e. not private, but auto generated is ok), and the compiler can copy or optimise out copies as it sees fit. See answer from DeadMG. –  Bingo Jan 15 '12 at 6:32

The compiler can copy your exception object as many times as it likes. The destructor is called twice because there's a copy.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1: The other two answers are wrong, trying to guess what goes underneath is irrelevant, the implementation is allowed to copy. Also, both are wrong in their guess both in g++-4.5: no copies performed at all, and VS2010 (according to DanDan): two copies even when catching by reference, hinting that the copy is performed either in the throw or internally. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 23 '11 at 17:03

Because catch block gets a copy of the original object.

To avoid copy, write try-catch as:

try
{
    fun();
}
catch(const base &e)
{
    cout<<"handle all exception"<<endl;
}

I would like to comment on the design as well : user-defined exception class should derive from std::exception or one of its derived class.

share|improve this answer
1  
Better comment would be do not throw exception at all. –  DumbCoder Jun 23 '11 at 15:34
    
@DumbCoder: Why? –  Nawaz Jun 23 '11 at 15:41
1  
I believe you know about the linkages embedded by the compiler for handling exceptions. –  DumbCoder Jun 23 '11 at 15:45
    
@DumbCoder: So what do you suggest as an alternative to exception? –  Nawaz Jun 23 '11 at 15:46
1  
@Nawaz, catch(...) => capture the excpetion by reference?? –  Alok Jun 23 '11 at 15:49

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