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Reopen Please vote for reopening this.It is not same question which is marked below. Note in this question () bracket has also been used.So using () braces should have a definite behavior.

Possible Duplicate:
post and pre increment in c

Here are 2 programs

Program 1

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
int b=5;
int c= (b++)+(++b);
printf("%d",c);
}

output
12

Program 2

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
int b=5;
int c= (b++) + (++b) + (++b) + (++b); 
printf("%d",c);
}

output
27

I took program 2 from here the logic on the link seems to be correct since for same logic the output of program 1 is 12. Which seems correct.

But for same explanation in program2 output is 27 and not 29. So why is this difference coming that is what I want to understand. What is wrong in explanation given on that link?

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marked as duplicate by Oli Charlesworth, Mark Wilkins, Didier Trosset, forsvarir, Bo Persson Jun 23 '11 at 16:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Why is people so fixed in trying to make undefined behaviour work as they expect? –  uʍop ǝpısdn Jun 23 '11 at 15:42
    
yep, is a boring day today.... –  Felice Pollano Jun 23 '11 at 15:43
    
Using parentheses does not make the least bit of difference. This question is a duplicate and it belongs closed. Please don't reopen. –  R.. Jun 23 '11 at 16:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no operator precedence problem here. There is undefined behaviour due to senquence points missing between the various operations on b.

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please let me know how putting sequence point in above code can improve its behavior. –  Registered User Jun 23 '11 at 16:02
2  
Here's how to create sequence points to eliminate undefined behavior: int c = b++; c += ++b; c += ++b; c += ++b; As you can see, it's now clearly defined what will happen. –  tomlogic Jun 23 '11 at 16:19
    
@tomlogic yes got your point.Unfortunately the question is closed so not possible to accept it as answer. –  Registered User Jun 23 '11 at 18:16

Incrementing more than once in one expression is Undefined Behaviour™, which means that anything can happen, including your compiler writer coming around your house and smacking you around the head with a baseball bat and the output of the program is a picture of your brains. Whoever wrote the content that you linked to didn't know what they were talking about and it's flat out wrong.

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+1 for artistic license –  grok12 Jun 24 '11 at 4:05

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