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Given the code (a lot of it stripped out)

// A data set
$.DataArea = function() {

    // Default options
    $.extend(this, {
        'class': "DataSet",
        'bars': new Array(),
        'container': null,
        'containerId': null,
        'gridsize': 20,
        'width': 400,
        'height': 400,
        'currentSelectedBar': 0
    });

    // Add a bar to this object
    this.addBar = function(startDate, endDate, label, styleID) {

        // When the bar is clicked
        $('#' + barID).click(function() {

            alert($(this).currentSelectedBar);
            if (this.currentSelectedBar != undefined)
                $('#' + this.currentSelectedBar).fadeIn("slow");

            this.currentSelectedBar = barID;
                $('#' + barID).fadeTo("slow", 0.5);

        });
    }

When I alert($(this).currentSelectedBar); it always comes out as undefined, it's not setting the value properly. Any ideas why this might be?

The idea is when you click on a bar, it fades it out, and when you click another the last bar to fade out fades in as well.

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1  
I think you have more than just this one problem. As @Robert correctly pointed in his comment to my (now deleted) answer, this refers to the DOM element you bind the event handler to. –  Felix Kling Jun 23 '11 at 16:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you are calling addBar on an instance of DataArea, your code should be:

// Add a bar to this object
this.addBar = function(startDate, endDate, label, styleID) {
    var self = this;
    // When the bar is clicked
    $('#' + barID).click(function() {

        alert(self.currentSelectedBar);
        if (self.currentSelectedBar != undefined)
            $('#' + self.currentSelectedBar).fadeIn("slow");

        self.currentSelectedBar = this.id;
        $(this).fadeTo("slow", 0.5);
    });
}

Inside the click handler, this will refer to the DOM element '#' + barID. But the properties are assigned to some other element and not that DOM element.

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Perfect thanks! –  Tom Gullen Jun 23 '11 at 16:31

The this in your callback function refers to the element that rises the event : in that case $('#' + barID). I guess you want to access the this that you extended. In that case, you should write something like that :

this.addBar = function(startDate, endDate, label, styleID) {
    var self = this

    // When the bar is clicked
    $('#' + barID).click(function() {

        alert($(self).currentSelectedBar);
        if (self.currentSelectedBar != undefined)
            $('#' + self.currentSelectedBar).fadeIn("slow");

        self.currentSelectedBar = barID;
        $(this).fadeTo("slow", 0.5);

    });
}
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    var that = this;
    $('#' + barID).click(function() {

        alert(that.currentSelectedBar);
        if (that.currentSelectedBar != undefined)
            $('#' + this.currentSelectedBar).fadeIn("slow");

        that.currentSelectedBar = barID;
            $('#' + barID).fadeTo("slow", 0.5);

    });

Cache the value of this outside the click function. inside the click function, the context this is the DOM node that was clicked.

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It looks like you're having an issue with the behavior of jQuery.

$('#' + barID).click(function() { remaps the definition of this, but having attempted to add attributes to it previously will have no effect because the definition of this has been overwritten.

As mentioned by recmashak you can put the original this into a variable and then use it when you do your alert

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jQuery has nothing to do with it. It's basic Javascript scoping rules. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 23 '11 at 17:24
    
I don't think what I said was necessarily wrong. It was a conscious decision for the jQuery developers to remap this inside of event handlers. Prototype doesn't do that (you call event.element() instead). Without that remapping this, it would have referred to the this.addBar object, which is JavaScript scoping rules (and still not the same as the original this that was extended) –  nzifnab Jun 23 '11 at 17:43

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