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Working with CSS3 I see no reason why a CSS based Ken burns effect would not work. My first attempt involved using Jquery to add a new class to a background image.

.flare1 {
    background-position:-50.1px -50.1px !important;
    -webkit-transition: all 5s ease-in-out;
}
function gallery() {
    $('.cornerimg').addClass('flare1');
}

This worked but is frightfully jerky. So I am considering a different approach. How would it be if the images were set with a class animation from the beginning. I am not familiar with the CSS3 animations, only the transitions, however the purpose being to apply a permanent class to a series of images that caused them to Ken Burn smoothly all the time.

I have prepared a lovely testing ground for anyone fancying a go. http://jsfiddle.net/gxUhH/10/

All set up based on my initial code.

Any ideas?

Marvellous

EDIT --

Well chaps I found this that appears to be very smooth. What I cannot see is what about it is different. They are using the translate function in web-kit instead but when I tried that it just jumped. Take a look. http://thing13.net/2010/02/css3-ken-burns-effect-2/

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2  
I'm confused...the Ken Burns effect refers to zooming and panning. –  Michael Mior Jun 23 '11 at 18:15
    
Have a look at this implementation of a pure css3 slideshow using pan and zoom: css3slideshow.remabledesigns.com –  ThomasS Jun 28 '13 at 11:24

4 Answers 4

Your motion is jerky because you can only move the background by a minimum of 1 pixel at a time. You can test this by setting the background-position to 10px and the transition time to 10s linear, and you'll see that once per second the image shifts by exactly one pixel.

One pixel might not sound like much, but when you're moving slowly it's quite noticeable.

My solution would be to move the image more quickly. At least 20 pixels per second would be the the minimum speed for smooth-looking motion.

Sadly until browsers implement hardware acceleration, you probably won't be getting real-time sub-pixel resampling on background images.

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I thought of this too but then i found an alleged CSS3 script that did it. Any idea how they achieved this thing13.net/2010/02/css3-ken-burns-effect-2 –  Robin Knight Jun 23 '11 at 18:22
    
It looks smoother there because they move more than 200 pixels in 4 seconds, or roughly 50 pixels per second. You'll notice that even in their example, at the end of the ease-in-out transition it gets jumpy because it slows down to < 20 pixels per second. –  hughes Jun 23 '11 at 18:27
    
Actually, it looks like they're also hiding the jumpiness by resizing the image as it moves. This may provide the illusion of smoother motion, but again the image size will not change in increments less than one pixel. –  hughes Jun 23 '11 at 18:29
    
Do not ask me how but I appear to have done it jsfiddle.net/gxUhH/47. The only problem now is that if you scroll on a touchscreen device the screen it then becomes jerky. So i think we need to pause it until the screen stops scrolling. Any ideas. I'll post a new question –  Robin Knight Jun 24 '11 at 11:10

You could do something like this for your CSS. (Customize as needed)

#gallery .imageitem {
    width:680px;
    height:380px;
    overflow:hidden;
    background-position:0px 0px;
    background-repeat:no-repeat;
}
.flare1 {
    -moz-animation-duration: 1.5s;
    -webkit-animation-duration: 1.5s;
    -moz-animation-name: slide;
    -webkit-animation-name: slide;  
    -moz-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
    -webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
    -moz-animation-timing-function: linear;
    -webkit-animation-timing-function: linear;
    -moz-animation-direction: alternate;
    -webkit-animation-direction: alternate;
}

@-moz-keyframes slide {
  from {
    background-position: 0px;
  }

  to {
    background-position: -100px;
  }
}

@-webkit-keyframes slide {

  from {
    background-position: 0px;
  }

  to {
    background-position: -100px;
  }
}
.cornerimg {
    width:680px;
    height:380px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/gxUhH/23/

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I've just tried that at slow speed and direction and it is unfortunately just as jerky. I have found this one though. It is very smooth but what I cannot figure out is how it is any different. thing13.net/2010/02/css3-ken-burns-effect-2 Any ideas. –  Robin Knight Jun 23 '11 at 18:26
    
You can use percentages in the following way to make the animation smoother 0% { left: 0px; top: 0px; } 39% { left: 50px; top: 50px; } 78% { left: 100px; top: 100px; } 100% { left: 150px; top: 150px; } –  tomoguisuru Jun 23 '11 at 21:54

I tried a quick hack with the code from protofunc which uses a backgroundPosition jQuery plugin. The plugin lets you control background position like:

$(this).animate({'background-position': '500px 150px'})

I put a giant JPG as a background image on a small div. Then animations can be triggered by clicking, or stacked through callback events, and all the usual stuff jQuery can do. And it runs real smooth in Chrome on my machine.

After re-reading your question it doesn't use CSS3 though... so not a very helpful answer! :P

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I've just tried that at slow speed and direction and it is unfortunately just as jerky. I have found this one though. It is very smooth but what I cannot figure out is how it is any different. thing13.net/2010/02/css3-ken-burns-effect-2 Any ideas. –  Robin Knight Jun 23 '11 at 18:26
    
Looking at the Mozilla documentation it looks like keyframe animations sometimes skip animation frames so as not to hog CPU resources. As CSS3 transitions are experimental (and not widely supported) I wonder if they don't suffer the same skipping of frames –  Tak Jun 23 '11 at 18:55
    
. They appear not to at all. But they are still based on linear 1px animation irritatingly. It is not a problem that they're not widely supported.We already have a JQuery function purpose built but with CSS3 being significantly faster and more efficient I wanted to defailt to JQuery only if CSS3 was not supported. We have made progress on the Fiddle but still cannot help the jerkyness unless aiming at 20px a second. –  Robin Knight Jun 23 '11 at 19:01

Well chaps do not ask me how but via keyframe animation it is now smooth. http://jsfiddle.net/gxUhH/47/

Just one problem though. When one scrolls on a touchscreen device the page it them becomes jerky. I think we need to pause it on scroll and then play again once the scrolling has finished.

Any ideas?

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