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I'm using R. Let's say I have a vector of cities and I want to use those city names individually in a string.

city = c("Dallas", "Houston", "El Paso", "Waco")

phrase = c("Hey {city}, what's the meaning of life?")

So I want to end up with four seperate phrases.

"Hey Dallas, what's the meaning of life?"
"Hey Houston, what's the meaning of life?"
...

Is there a function similar to format() in Python which will allow me to perform this task in a simple/efficient manner?

Would like to avoid something like below.

for( i in city){
    phrase = c("Hey ", i, "what's the meaning of life?")
}
share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

How about sprintf?

> city = c("Dallas", "Houston", "El Paso", "Waco")
> phrase = c("Hey %s, what's the meaning of life?")
> sprintf(phrase, city)
[1] "Hey Dallas, what's the meaning of life?"  "Hey Houston, what's the meaning of life?"
[3] "Hey El Paso, what's the meaning of life?" "Hey Waco, what's the meaning of life?"   
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Never knew about sprintf() Thanks! – ATMathew Jun 23 '11 at 20:43
    
There's no printf, but you can roll your own with printf <- function(format_string, ...) {cat(sprintf(format_string, ...))} – Zach Sep 16 '11 at 17:20

Depending on how complicated it needs to be, a simple paste could do the job:

paste("Hey ", city, ", what's the meaning of life", sep="")

does what you want.

@Zach's answer, sprintf has a lot of advantages though, like proper formatting of doubles etc.

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