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In the pseudocode below I have 3 layers: UI, BL, and DL for ASP.NET WebForms app. Can someone give me some pointers about why would I need to use Dependency Injection and Unity here? I am using interfaces a lot (mostly for 3rd party components like Mail or File Parsers so I can replace them as needed without changing other layers), but I do not get why I should use interfaces on EF EntityObjects. I can not seem to find one example on the web which would show a practical advantage beyond theoretical unreal cases.

namespace Sample.ASP.NET.UI
{

  using Sample.ASP.NET.BusinessLayer;
  using Sample.ASP.NET.DataModel;

  protected class AspxCodeFile
  {
      protected Page_Load()
      {
          GridView.DataSource=BusinesLayer.Products.GetProductsAsList();
      }
   }
}

namespace Sample.ASP.NET.BusinessLayer
{
  using Sample.ASP.NET.DataModel;

  protected class Products
  {
    public static List<Product> GetProductsAsList()
    {
      EdmxEntities DB=new EdmxEntities();
      return DB.Products.ToList<Product>();
    }
  }
}

namespace Sample.ASP.NET.DataLayer
{
    // wrapper namespace for Entity Framework designer
    // generated code off SQL Server 2008 database
    // where one of the tables is called Products
    // and designer created Product EntityObject
    // this Product entity is referenced in both
    // UI and BL.
}
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2 Answers 2

In addition to the points Ladislav has made, there are a few others: -

  1. You can use Unity to decorate methods and classes with cross cutting concerns (in Unity these are called behaviours). You can use behaviours anywhere, but I have used this with EF to do things like: -

    • Automatic creation / save / cleanup of your object contexts
    • Automatic caching of e.g. reference data
    • Logging of method call times to find performance bottlenecks on the DAL
  2. Slightly more design related, but using Dependency Inversion Principle you can more loosely couple your system so e.g. your UI does not reference the Business Layer (and potentially decoupled from EF entirely depending on how you're generating your entities).

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In your scenario you obviously don't need it. People use dependency injection when they need to inject dependencies and replace them with other implementation - most common reason is automated testing and mocking / faking / stubing dependencies. Another reasons are dynamic behaviors.

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